Citation

Eastern European Civil Society Development: The End of a Transnational Philanthropic Project

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Abstract:

The collapse of communism in 1989 in Eastern Europe propelled the idea of civil society into Western political and foreign aid discourses and gave rise to the global project of civil society development that sees nonprofit organizations as critical building blocks of civil society and therefore democracy. American philanthropic foundations were especially driven by this profound trust in civil society; though the sentiment was widespread among most democratizing agents (Carothers 1999; Cornell Gorka 1996; Katz 1999; Stanton 1999). The paper seeks to contribute to our understanding of the global diffusion of institutional models. First, it provides a historical overview of the rise of post-communist civil society development as an institution-building project in Eastern Europe. Second, it explores the exit strategy of the largest philanthropic donors from seven Eastern European countries – Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia – in order to assess the desired outcomes of this massive transnational institutional project that united American private foundations into enduring philanthropic partnerships.
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Association:
Name: Seventeenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies
URL:
http://www.ces.columbia.edu


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p401248_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Fazekas, Erzsebet. "Eastern European Civil Society Development: The End of a Transnational Philanthropic Project" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Seventeenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies, Grand Plaza, Montreal, Canada, Apr 15, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p401248_index.html>

APA Citation:

Fazekas, E. , 2010-04-15 "Eastern European Civil Society Development: The End of a Transnational Philanthropic Project" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Seventeenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies, Grand Plaza, Montreal, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p401248_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The collapse of communism in 1989 in Eastern Europe propelled the idea of civil society into Western political and foreign aid discourses and gave rise to the global project of civil society development that sees nonprofit organizations as critical building blocks of civil society and therefore democracy. American philanthropic foundations were especially driven by this profound trust in civil society; though the sentiment was widespread among most democratizing agents (Carothers 1999; Cornell Gorka 1996; Katz 1999; Stanton 1999). The paper seeks to contribute to our understanding of the global diffusion of institutional models. First, it provides a historical overview of the rise of post-communist civil society development as an institution-building project in Eastern Europe. Second, it explores the exit strategy of the largest philanthropic donors from seven Eastern European countries – Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Hungary, Poland, Romania, Slovakia and Slovenia – in order to assess the desired outcomes of this massive transnational institutional project that united American private foundations into enduring philanthropic partnerships.


Similar Titles:
Squaring the Velvet Triangle?: Typologies of European transnational civil society interactions in European diversity policy

Transnational Linkages: Turkish Civil Society and the European Union

National and Transnational Strategies of Civil Society Organizations: Modes of Interaction and the Political Environment in Western and Eastern Europe for Equality and Non-Discrimination


 
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