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Implementation of the Bologna Process in Belgium

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Abstract:

The Minister of Education of Flanders (the Dutch speaking region of Belgium) was one of the 29 European Ministers who signed the Bologna Declaration in July 1999. Consequently, the Flemish government and Flemish universities began to prepare for higher education reform in accordance with the Bologna objectives. This resulted in the acceptance of a new law on the structure of higher education in 2003. The new law regulated the gradual year by year introduction of programmes in the bachelor master structure from 2004-2005 onwards. This law was followed by several other (student participation 2004, flexibility 2004, teacher training 2007, funding 2008), together changing the framework for higher education in Flanders quite drastically. This clearly posed a challenge to the higher education institutions, but at the same time Bologna and its subsequent reforms were taken as an impetus for change at the institutional level as well. All programmes were revised and internally accredited, the education and examination regulations were revised, a procedure for the accreditation of prior learning was introduced, and measures were taken to facility student mobility between programmes. Also in Wallonia (the French speaking region of Belgium) the Bologna Declaration lead to changes in the higher education system. The law on Bologna of 2004 resulted in the restructuring of the study programmes, the refinancing of the institutions, the introduction of the ECTS system, the establishment of an agency for quality assurance, and the encouragement of collaboration between higher education institutions. This led, among other things, to cooperation in associations between universities and even to the amalgamation of certain universities. This paper describes the differences between the higher education systems of Flanders and Wallonia, then specifies the legal context of the reforms as a result of the Bologna Declaration, and describes the management structures and procedures that were developed at the level of the higher education institutions (and the University of Leuven in particular) in order to implement these innovations following the Bologna declaration.
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Association:
Name: Seventeenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies
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http://www.ces.columbia.edu


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p401653_index.html
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MLA Citation:

De Wit, Kurt. "Implementation of the Bologna Process in Belgium" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Seventeenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies, Grand Plaza, Montreal, Canada, <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p401653_index.html>

APA Citation:

De Wit, K. "Implementation of the Bologna Process in Belgium" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Seventeenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies, Grand Plaza, Montreal, Canada <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p401653_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: The Minister of Education of Flanders (the Dutch speaking region of Belgium) was one of the 29 European Ministers who signed the Bologna Declaration in July 1999. Consequently, the Flemish government and Flemish universities began to prepare for higher education reform in accordance with the Bologna objectives. This resulted in the acceptance of a new law on the structure of higher education in 2003. The new law regulated the gradual year by year introduction of programmes in the bachelor master structure from 2004-2005 onwards. This law was followed by several other (student participation 2004, flexibility 2004, teacher training 2007, funding 2008), together changing the framework for higher education in Flanders quite drastically. This clearly posed a challenge to the higher education institutions, but at the same time Bologna and its subsequent reforms were taken as an impetus for change at the institutional level as well. All programmes were revised and internally accredited, the education and examination regulations were revised, a procedure for the accreditation of prior learning was introduced, and measures were taken to facility student mobility between programmes. Also in Wallonia (the French speaking region of Belgium) the Bologna Declaration lead to changes in the higher education system. The law on Bologna of 2004 resulted in the restructuring of the study programmes, the refinancing of the institutions, the introduction of the ECTS system, the establishment of an agency for quality assurance, and the encouragement of collaboration between higher education institutions. This led, among other things, to cooperation in associations between universities and even to the amalgamation of certain universities. This paper describes the differences between the higher education systems of Flanders and Wallonia, then specifies the legal context of the reforms as a result of the Bologna Declaration, and describes the management structures and procedures that were developed at the level of the higher education institutions (and the University of Leuven in particular) in order to implement these innovations following the Bologna declaration.


Similar Titles:
Political Economy influences on implementing the Bologna Process

Beyond Bologna: Implementing the Process and Challenges Ahead

Comparative study of the Bologna process in Belgium, Netherlands, Germany and Italy: Values and dilemmas of transformations


 
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