Citation

Lone-Parent Families and Poverty in Europe: Do New Social Risks Alter Regime Trajectories?

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Abstract:

Lone-parent families have been, at least for a century if not longer, one of the “categories” of social and family policy analysis. Until recent decades most often created by the death of a – breadwinning – parent, such families in the last decades have been created in a much wider variety of ways. Rising rates of divorce, cohabitation and unstable couples, teenage pregnancies, and other changes to social norms have all contributed both to the increase in lone-parent families and to public policy attention to them. Despite the shift in ways that a lone-parent family may be created, there is a long-standing policy challenge that has never changed: households with one parent have a higher risk of poverty.

In the last two decades, adjustment of social policies to address the high poverty risk of lone-parent families has occurred in the context of broader restructuring of welfare regimes, sometimes termed modernisation and sometimes the social investment perspective. This restructuring includes activation policies to induce all adults into the labour market and a strong discursive emphasis on investments in human capital. Among the standard policy responses deployed since the mid-1990s are activation programmes targeting all adults of working age, income transfers supplementing inadequate earnings and support for non-parental child care.

This paper examines an example of each type of welfare regime (Great Britain, Sweden and France) and focuses on new arrangements linking social supports and activation (“welfare to work”) and income supplementation (“make work pay”) as well as supports for childcare (“investments in human capital”). All three countries have acted on each of these issues. The paper asks whether the attention to new social risks has altered the policy logic of each case (and regime type), setting it on a new trajectory. We observe that when regimes confront the challenge of lone-parenthood all three have moved in similar directions, towards more residual forms of policy intervention.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

social (162), parent (144), lone (133), famili (117), polici (115), work (85), employ (72), welfar (71), lone-par (70), poverti (66), regim (64), rate (58), incom (56), benefit (55), child (49), labour (47), invest (46), market (40), one (39), programm (39), new (38),
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Association:
Name: Seventeenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies
URL:
http://www.ces.columbia.edu


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p401930_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Jenson, Jane. and Duyulmus, Cem. "Lone-Parent Families and Poverty in Europe: Do New Social Risks Alter Regime Trajectories?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Seventeenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies, Grand Plaza, Montreal, Canada, <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p401930_index.html>

APA Citation:

Jenson, J. and Duyulmus, C. U. "Lone-Parent Families and Poverty in Europe: Do New Social Risks Alter Regime Trajectories?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Seventeenth International Conference of the Council for European Studies, Grand Plaza, Montreal, Canada Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p401930_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Lone-parent families have been, at least for a century if not longer, one of the “categories” of social and family policy analysis. Until recent decades most often created by the death of a – breadwinning – parent, such families in the last decades have been created in a much wider variety of ways. Rising rates of divorce, cohabitation and unstable couples, teenage pregnancies, and other changes to social norms have all contributed both to the increase in lone-parent families and to public policy attention to them. Despite the shift in ways that a lone-parent family may be created, there is a long-standing policy challenge that has never changed: households with one parent have a higher risk of poverty.

In the last two decades, adjustment of social policies to address the high poverty risk of lone-parent families has occurred in the context of broader restructuring of welfare regimes, sometimes termed modernisation and sometimes the social investment perspective. This restructuring includes activation policies to induce all adults into the labour market and a strong discursive emphasis on investments in human capital. Among the standard policy responses deployed since the mid-1990s are activation programmes targeting all adults of working age, income transfers supplementing inadequate earnings and support for non-parental child care.

This paper examines an example of each type of welfare regime (Great Britain, Sweden and France) and focuses on new arrangements linking social supports and activation (“welfare to work”) and income supplementation (“make work pay”) as well as supports for childcare (“investments in human capital”). All three countries have acted on each of these issues. The paper asks whether the attention to new social risks has altered the policy logic of each case (and regime type), setting it on a new trajectory. We observe that when regimes confront the challenge of lone-parenthood all three have moved in similar directions, towards more residual forms of policy intervention.


Similar Titles:
Lone-Parent Families and Poverty: Examining Dutch Policy Responses to New Social Risks to Comprehend Multidimensional Changes of Continental Welfare States

Active Labour Market Policies and Social Integration in Germany: Do Welfare-to-Work Programs Combat Social Exclusion?

Gender and Public Policy Debates on Employer-Provided Benefits: Toward an Explanation of Shortcomings in U.S. Work-Family Policy


 
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