Citation

Business as Usual, or an Unusual Business? Celebrating and Blaming Business During the Global Financial Crisis in Australian Journalism

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Abstract:

In June 2008, as the global financial crisis emerged, Rupert Murdoch’s flagship national daily newspaper, The Australian, re-launched its online business section incorporating a partnership with the recently-acquired Wall Street Journal. The venture, supported by significant investment at a time when most newspapers were cutting costs, captured the Janus-faced nature of contemporary newspaper publishing. Over the past 40 years business became a central feature of editorial content, leveraging additional high-value readers and advertising revenue. Business journalism has been celebratory of ‘success’, rich individuals and enterprise, a trend coinciding with a growth in corporate public affairs management and leading to criticisms that too much business journalism was ‘churnalism’. In contrast the same environment damaged newspapers’ business model, resulting in the disappearance of hundreds of journalism jobs. The focus on short-term financial gains, were disabling newspapers editorially. This paper explores the extent that the crisis disrupted the ways in which Australian newspaper journalism represented business, and how the relationship between business and journalism was construed.
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Association:
Name: International Communication Association
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http://www.icahdq.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p403688_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Bromley, Michael. "Business as Usual, or an Unusual Business? Celebrating and Blaming Business During the Global Financial Crisis in Australian Journalism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Suntec Singapore International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Suntec City, Singapore, <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p403688_index.html>

APA Citation:

Bromley, M. S. "Business as Usual, or an Unusual Business? Celebrating and Blaming Business During the Global Financial Crisis in Australian Journalism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Suntec Singapore International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Suntec City, Singapore <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p403688_index.html

Publication Type: Session Paper
Abstract: In June 2008, as the global financial crisis emerged, Rupert Murdoch’s flagship national daily newspaper, The Australian, re-launched its online business section incorporating a partnership with the recently-acquired Wall Street Journal. The venture, supported by significant investment at a time when most newspapers were cutting costs, captured the Janus-faced nature of contemporary newspaper publishing. Over the past 40 years business became a central feature of editorial content, leveraging additional high-value readers and advertising revenue. Business journalism has been celebratory of ‘success’, rich individuals and enterprise, a trend coinciding with a growth in corporate public affairs management and leading to criticisms that too much business journalism was ‘churnalism’. In contrast the same environment damaged newspapers’ business model, resulting in the disappearance of hundreds of journalism jobs. The focus on short-term financial gains, were disabling newspapers editorially. This paper explores the extent that the crisis disrupted the ways in which Australian newspaper journalism represented business, and how the relationship between business and journalism was construed.


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No More "Business as Usual": Global Agricultural Knowledge and Creating the IAASTD


 
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