Citation

Bias in the Flesh: Attack Ads and the Effects of Visual Cues in the 2008 Presidential Campaign

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Abstract:

It is clear that political advertisements employ a battery of negative visual cues in attack advertisements. But do they do so in ways that play on widely held implicit biases? Despite the rich literature on implicit attitudes, the extent to which today's political campaigns systematically employ cues associated with negative implicit attitudes in attack ads has not been adequately documented, nor has the question of whether such cues can affect voters in the context of an actual election. We devised a method that allows us to quantitatively assess (1) the extent to which the 2008 McCain and Obama campaigns depicted their opponents in ways that can play on the public's implicit attitudes about race in the case of Obama and age in the case of McCain; and (2) assess the public's affective response to similar depictions of each candidate, presented via the Affect Misattribution Procedure.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

q (255), imag (95), obama (75), skin (73), qq (72), ad (65), campaign (65), implicit (57), p (57), mccain (56), tone (44), 2008 (44), attitud (42), black (42), v (42), 1 (39), satur (38), candid (38), color (38), social (37), use (35),
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Association:
Name: International Communication Association
URL:
http://www.icahdq.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p405340_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Messing, Solomon., Plaut, Ethan. and Jabon, Maria. "Bias in the Flesh: Attack Ads and the Effects of Visual Cues in the 2008 Presidential Campaign" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Suntec Singapore International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Suntec City, Singapore, Jun 22, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p405340_index.html>

APA Citation:

Messing, S. , Plaut, E. and Jabon, M. , 2010-06-22 "Bias in the Flesh: Attack Ads and the Effects of Visual Cues in the 2008 Presidential Campaign" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the International Communication Association, Suntec Singapore International Convention & Exhibition Centre, Suntec City, Singapore Online <APPLICATION/X-PDF>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p405340_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: It is clear that political advertisements employ a battery of negative visual cues in attack advertisements. But do they do so in ways that play on widely held implicit biases? Despite the rich literature on implicit attitudes, the extent to which today's political campaigns systematically employ cues associated with negative implicit attitudes in attack ads has not been adequately documented, nor has the question of whether such cues can affect voters in the context of an actual election. We devised a method that allows us to quantitatively assess (1) the extent to which the 2008 McCain and Obama campaigns depicted their opponents in ways that can play on the public's implicit attitudes about race in the case of Obama and age in the case of McCain; and (2) assess the public's affective response to similar depictions of each candidate, presented via the Affect Misattribution Procedure.


Similar Titles:
THE COLOR OF THE CAMPAIGN: A Quasi-Experimental Study of the Influence of Skin Color on Candidate Evaluation

An Analysis of Candidates McCain and Obama’s Rhetoric During the 2008 Presidential Campaign


 
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