Citation

Sitting down to stand up: Black student suspensions/expulsions at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), 1960--1962: A phenomenological study

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Abstract:

February 1, 2010 will mark fifty years since the historic Greensboro, North Carolina Student Sit-in that was undertaken by four freshman students at the Woolworth’s Department Store. Greensboro galvanized a new social and cultural force within the Civil Rights Movement that refocused the struggle against racial segregation when thousands of students challenged the South's segregation laws by becoming involved in the nonviolent Black student Sit-in Movement. This paper engages the lens of an investigation rooted in a phenomenological study that researched the lived experiences of six African American students (three women and three men) who were suspended or expelled from five Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) between 1960 and 1962 as a result of their participation and/or arrest in the Black student sit-in movement. The paper identifies a unique thematic approach that contextualizes the experiences of the participants who by their actions contributed to dismantling the South's segregation laws. The paper describes how students expelled from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU’s) despite the interruption in their education and separation from family and community demonstrated resilience in pursuing other alternatives to meet their educational goals at great emotional, physical, and financial sacrifice. The paper asserts the primacy of pre-existing formations as having played a primary role in spearheading the sit-ins that involved students who attended Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).
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Association:
Name: 34th Annual National Council for Black Studies
URL:
http://www.ncbsonline.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p405707_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Mealy PhD., Rosemari. "Sitting down to stand up: Black student suspensions/expulsions at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), 1960--1962: A phenomenological study" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 34th Annual National Council for Black Studies, Sheraton New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Mar 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p405707_index.html>

APA Citation:

Mealy PhD., R. , 2010-03-17 "Sitting down to stand up: Black student suspensions/expulsions at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), 1960--1962: A phenomenological study" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 34th Annual National Council for Black Studies, Sheraton New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p405707_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: February 1, 2010 will mark fifty years since the historic Greensboro, North Carolina Student Sit-in that was undertaken by four freshman students at the Woolworth’s Department Store. Greensboro galvanized a new social and cultural force within the Civil Rights Movement that refocused the struggle against racial segregation when thousands of students challenged the South's segregation laws by becoming involved in the nonviolent Black student Sit-in Movement. This paper engages the lens of an investigation rooted in a phenomenological study that researched the lived experiences of six African American students (three women and three men) who were suspended or expelled from five Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs) between 1960 and 1962 as a result of their participation and/or arrest in the Black student sit-in movement. The paper identifies a unique thematic approach that contextualizes the experiences of the participants who by their actions contributed to dismantling the South's segregation laws. The paper describes how students expelled from Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCU’s) despite the interruption in their education and separation from family and community demonstrated resilience in pursuing other alternatives to meet their educational goals at great emotional, physical, and financial sacrifice. The paper asserts the primacy of pre-existing formations as having played a primary role in spearheading the sit-ins that involved students who attended Historically Black Colleges and Universities (HBCUs).


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