Citation

Deep-Sightings and Rescue Missions: 21st Century Radical Resistance and Activism from Women in the Academy

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Abstract:

This paper explores what politically-engaged radical activism and scholarly work might look like for 21st century black intellectuals in our alleged “post-racial Age of Obama”? In this fleeting post-Civil Rights era marked by diminished black revolutionary critiques, radical movements, and progressive activism, where are our models and intellectual anchors? Where might the commitment to political activism begin for the scholar located in those elite sights of higher learning? Central to the question of activism is not only the issue of how to speak on it as we seek to engage varying forms robust activism, but also the task of rearticulating what effective, sustained activism can look like and do.
This paper examines the tools and strategies of Joy James, a black intellectual-activist who straddles the worlds of academe and activism, and in doing so utilizes her platform in the “Ivory Tower” and in scholarly publications as sounding boards to give presence and resonance to those enduring, pervasive forms of injustice within regimes/institutions of subjugation and dehumanization. Extending the activism of Angela Davis, James discloses and demystifies the proliferation of state-sanctioned abuses (in its many guises) carried out on some of this nation’s most vulnerable and powerless populations. James’ sustained radical critiques - throughout her entire body of work, seek to disabuse fallacious contemporary proclamations of a golden post-racial, equal opportunity society. Providing public forums and audiences for marginalized and politically repressed narratives of subjugated and policed populations - those without elite affiliations - James’ blend of scholarly-grassroots activism is distinctly unique when thinking about innovative black intellectual activism for women who are located in the “Ivory tower.” Her communally-rooted ethos and ethical commitment (not driven by profit hustling or academic celebrity elitism), demonstrate the shape and contours of a necessary kind of sustained activism that can be facilitated by and emanate from black scholars in the academy.
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Association:
Name: 34th Annual National Council for Black Studies
URL:
http://www.ncbsonline.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p405740_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Smith, April. "Deep-Sightings and Rescue Missions: 21st Century Radical Resistance and Activism from Women in the Academy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 34th Annual National Council for Black Studies, Sheraton New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p405740_index.html>

APA Citation:

Smith, A. F. "Deep-Sightings and Rescue Missions: 21st Century Radical Resistance and Activism from Women in the Academy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 34th Annual National Council for Black Studies, Sheraton New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p405740_index.html

Publication Type: Panelist Abstract
Abstract: This paper explores what politically-engaged radical activism and scholarly work might look like for 21st century black intellectuals in our alleged “post-racial Age of Obama”? In this fleeting post-Civil Rights era marked by diminished black revolutionary critiques, radical movements, and progressive activism, where are our models and intellectual anchors? Where might the commitment to political activism begin for the scholar located in those elite sights of higher learning? Central to the question of activism is not only the issue of how to speak on it as we seek to engage varying forms robust activism, but also the task of rearticulating what effective, sustained activism can look like and do.
This paper examines the tools and strategies of Joy James, a black intellectual-activist who straddles the worlds of academe and activism, and in doing so utilizes her platform in the “Ivory Tower” and in scholarly publications as sounding boards to give presence and resonance to those enduring, pervasive forms of injustice within regimes/institutions of subjugation and dehumanization. Extending the activism of Angela Davis, James discloses and demystifies the proliferation of state-sanctioned abuses (in its many guises) carried out on some of this nation’s most vulnerable and powerless populations. James’ sustained radical critiques - throughout her entire body of work, seek to disabuse fallacious contemporary proclamations of a golden post-racial, equal opportunity society. Providing public forums and audiences for marginalized and politically repressed narratives of subjugated and policed populations - those without elite affiliations - James’ blend of scholarly-grassroots activism is distinctly unique when thinking about innovative black intellectual activism for women who are located in the “Ivory tower.” Her communally-rooted ethos and ethical commitment (not driven by profit hustling or academic celebrity elitism), demonstrate the shape and contours of a necessary kind of sustained activism that can be facilitated by and emanate from black scholars in the academy.


Similar Titles:
Synthesis: Opportunities and Challenges of an Emerging Academy with the Active Learning of Global Governance in the 21st Century

Deep-Sightings and Rescue Missions: 21st Century Radical Resistance and Activism from Women in the Academy

New Directions in Activism: Women of Faith in the 21st Century


 
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