Citation

Black America’s Call for Civil Rights and the U.S. Emphasis on Mathematics and Science: Why Are African Americans and Minorities Underrepresented in Mathematics and Science and What Can Be Done?

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Over the past seventy to eighty years, there has been a movement in the United States to places greater emphasis on mathematics and science and calls for fundamental improvements in how these areas are and were being taught to the nation’s progeny (King, 2002, Tozer 1995). Be that as it may, currently African Americans and other minority groups are and have been considerably underrepresented in mathematics and science and other areas (Campbell, 2000, Lynch 2000, Berryman 1983). This paper explores and ask why African American and others minority groups are underrepresented in mathematic and science and particularly given Black America’s push for greater representation and equality throughout the U.S. society leading up to the Civil Rights Movement and the United States government’s call for more emphasis to be placed on the mathematics and sciences in U.S. schools and society. That is, why hasn’t there been “a convergence of interest” on a national or broad scale that addresses the United States “national concern” to be leading or continuing to lead in science and mathematics (technological superiority) and African Americans and other minorities call for greater equity and equality throughout society? This report examines this question from a mathematics teachers and researchers who has worked with science and mathematics educators perspective and offers insights and suggestions for how teachers, administrators, mathematics and science program organizers, and policy-makers can improve the outcomes and opportunities for African Americans and other minorities in mathematics and sciences and other areas, though not as much so that the United States can be first in its “technological superiority”, but rather more importantly that the United States can be a leader—among many--in the world in its commitment to the health and education of its people and the improvement of the world environment.






Berryman, S.E. (1983). Who will do science? Minority and female attainment of science and mathematics degrees: Trends and causes (Special Report). New York: The Rockefeller Foundation.

Campbell, G. (2000). United States demographics. In G.Campbell, R. Denes, and C. Morrison Access denied: Race, ethnicity, and the scientific enterprise. New York: Oxford University Press

King, K. (2001). Technology of science teaching and literacy: A century of growth New York: Kluwer Academic/ Plenum Publishers.

Lynch, S. (2000). Equity and science education reform. New Hersey: Lawrence Erlbauam Associates, Publishers.

Tozer, S. E., Violas, P. C., and Senese, G.B. (1995). School and society: historical and contemporary perspective. New York: McGraw Hill Inc.
Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 34th Annual National Council for Black Studies
URL:
http://www.ncbsonline.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p406059_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Beckham, Jerrell. "Black America’s Call for Civil Rights and the U.S. Emphasis on Mathematics and Science: Why Are African Americans and Minorities Underrepresented in Mathematics and Science and What Can Be Done?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 34th Annual National Council for Black Studies, Sheraton New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Mar 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p406059_index.html>

APA Citation:

Beckham, J. , 2010-03-17 "Black America’s Call for Civil Rights and the U.S. Emphasis on Mathematics and Science: Why Are African Americans and Minorities Underrepresented in Mathematics and Science and What Can Be Done?" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 34th Annual National Council for Black Studies, Sheraton New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p406059_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Presentation
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Over the past seventy to eighty years, there has been a movement in the United States to places greater emphasis on mathematics and science and calls for fundamental improvements in how these areas are and were being taught to the nation’s progeny (King, 2002, Tozer 1995). Be that as it may, currently African Americans and other minority groups are and have been considerably underrepresented in mathematics and science and other areas (Campbell, 2000, Lynch 2000, Berryman 1983). This paper explores and ask why African American and others minority groups are underrepresented in mathematic and science and particularly given Black America’s push for greater representation and equality throughout the U.S. society leading up to the Civil Rights Movement and the United States government’s call for more emphasis to be placed on the mathematics and sciences in U.S. schools and society. That is, why hasn’t there been “a convergence of interest” on a national or broad scale that addresses the United States “national concern” to be leading or continuing to lead in science and mathematics (technological superiority) and African Americans and other minorities call for greater equity and equality throughout society? This report examines this question from a mathematics teachers and researchers who has worked with science and mathematics educators perspective and offers insights and suggestions for how teachers, administrators, mathematics and science program organizers, and policy-makers can improve the outcomes and opportunities for African Americans and other minorities in mathematics and sciences and other areas, though not as much so that the United States can be first in its “technological superiority”, but rather more importantly that the United States can be a leader—among many--in the world in its commitment to the health and education of its people and the improvement of the world environment.






Berryman, S.E. (1983). Who will do science? Minority and female attainment of science and mathematics degrees: Trends and causes (Special Report). New York: The Rockefeller Foundation.

Campbell, G. (2000). United States demographics. In G.Campbell, R. Denes, and C. Morrison Access denied: Race, ethnicity, and the scientific enterprise. New York: Oxford University Press

King, K. (2001). Technology of science teaching and literacy: A century of growth New York: Kluwer Academic/ Plenum Publishers.

Lynch, S. (2000). Equity and science education reform. New Hersey: Lawrence Erlbauam Associates, Publishers.

Tozer, S. E., Violas, P. C., and Senese, G.B. (1995). School and society: historical and contemporary perspective. New York: McGraw Hill Inc.


Similar Titles:
Shelby’s Pragmatic Black Solidarity, A Resource for African American Studies in a Post-Civil Rights Era?

An Analysis of the( (MS)²) Program from Early African American Scholars' Perspectives: One Program Aimed at Improving African American Students' Achievement in Mathematics and Science Related Fields

The Ties that Bind: African American Sororities and the Civil Rights- Black Power Movement


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.