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A Comparative-Historical Analysis of Early 20th Century Mining in South Africa and the American South

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Abstract:

This paper is a comparative-historical analysis of race and labor in South Africa and the American South focusing on a question left largely unanswered by George Frederickson: “Why no industrial color bar in the United States?” White supremacy was a strong and persistent ideology in both countries, but it manifested itself differently in one particular area of life in South Africa. In the political sphere, blacks were disenfranchised and largely left without political and civil rights after civil wars in both countries. In the social sphere, social and spatial segregation by race was backed up by the power of the state in both countries. In the economic sphere though, it was only in South Africa that we see state-enforced industrial segregation.
What accounts for this deviation? Most studies utilize institutional or interest group explanations. My hypothesis is that ideologies concerning government involvement in the economy explain much of the difference. While socialist ideology left black workers at the mercy of racist white union members in South Africa, a free labor ideology inadvertently protected black workers in the American South by constraining rent-seeking actors from enacting a color bar. The mining industry is used as a case study.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

south (70), labor (60), ideolog (54), mine (49), state (49), black (47), worker (46), africa (44), polit (37), american (34), industri (34), bar (34), group (33), interest (33), econom (32), unit (31), press (30), colour (30), studi (30), univers (29), institut (27),
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Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
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http://www.asanet.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p408416_index.html
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MLA Citation:

McCabe, Joshua. "A Comparative-Historical Analysis of Early 20th Century Mining in South Africa and the American South" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 14, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p408416_index.html>

APA Citation:

McCabe, J. T. , 2010-08-14 "A Comparative-Historical Analysis of Early 20th Century Mining in South Africa and the American South" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA Online <PDF>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p408416_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper is a comparative-historical analysis of race and labor in South Africa and the American South focusing on a question left largely unanswered by George Frederickson: “Why no industrial color bar in the United States?” White supremacy was a strong and persistent ideology in both countries, but it manifested itself differently in one particular area of life in South Africa. In the political sphere, blacks were disenfranchised and largely left without political and civil rights after civil wars in both countries. In the social sphere, social and spatial segregation by race was backed up by the power of the state in both countries. In the economic sphere though, it was only in South Africa that we see state-enforced industrial segregation.
What accounts for this deviation? Most studies utilize institutional or interest group explanations. My hypothesis is that ideologies concerning government involvement in the economy explain much of the difference. While socialist ideology left black workers at the mercy of racist white union members in South Africa, a free labor ideology inadvertently protected black workers in the American South by constraining rent-seeking actors from enacting a color bar. The mining industry is used as a case study.


Similar Titles:
WIP ACCEPTED--Work in Progress Paper--Political Blackness: The Construction of Blackness in Brazil, France, South Africa, and the United States

Precarious Politics and the Labor Movement in the United States and South Africa


 
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