Citation

Work-Family and Work Outcomes Predicted by Past Work Hour Patterns

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

This paper expands the research linking work hours to work and work-family outcomes by taking a life-course approach to examining past patterns of work hours. I use data from the Cornell Community Study (631 men and 520 women in married and cohabiting couples), which provides retrospective job history data. A new method, the interpolated curve approach, is used to represent and compare respondents’ prior work hour histories, producing six empirically-derived clusters of work hour patterns. Work hour patterns differ substantially by sex, and show expected variation on current work hours, education, income, occupational status, and gender role attitudes. Regression analyses indicate that, net of current work hours and other current characteristics, past work hour patterns help to explain work-family spillover, work-family balance, and income for both men and women.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

work (244), hour (143), pattern (73), famili (66), time (51), 1 (46), cluster (45), long (45), women (44), current (43), 2 (40), work-famili (40), low (37), men (31), incom (30), life (24), past (24), spillov (23), averag (23), signific (23), differ (22),
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Association:
Name: American Sociological Association Annual Meeting
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http://www.asanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p411823_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Pixley, Joy. "Work-Family and Work Outcomes Predicted by Past Work Hour Patterns" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA, Aug 13, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p411823_index.html>

APA Citation:

Pixley, J. E. , 2010-08-13 "Work-Family and Work Outcomes Predicted by Past Work Hour Patterns" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the American Sociological Association Annual Meeting, Hilton Atlanta and Atlanta Marriott Marquis, Atlanta, GA Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p411823_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper expands the research linking work hours to work and work-family outcomes by taking a life-course approach to examining past patterns of work hours. I use data from the Cornell Community Study (631 men and 520 women in married and cohabiting couples), which provides retrospective job history data. A new method, the interpolated curve approach, is used to represent and compare respondents’ prior work hour histories, producing six empirically-derived clusters of work hour patterns. Work hour patterns differ substantially by sex, and show expected variation on current work hours, education, income, occupational status, and gender role attitudes. Regression analyses indicate that, net of current work hours and other current characteristics, past work hour patterns help to explain work-family spillover, work-family balance, and income for both men and women.


Similar Titles:
Young Kids at Home, Long Hours at Work: Gender Differences in the Health Consequences of Paid Work and Household Conditions

Work-Family Conflict in Dual-Earner Couples: The Effect of Joint Working Time and Family Life Stage

The Brighter Side of Work and Family Life: Family-Friendly Benefits and Positive Family-to-Work Spillover


 
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