Citation

Do Terrorists Win? The Use of Terrorism and Civil War Outcomes 1989-2009

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles




STOP!

You can now view the document associated with this citation by clicking on the "View Document as HTML" link below.

View Document as HTML:
Click here to view the document

Abstract:

How effective is terrorism? This question has generated lively scholarly debate and is of obvious importance to policy makers. However, most existing studies of terrorism are not particularly well equipped to answer this question for a simple reason – they lack an appropriate comparison. This paper compares the outcomes of civil wars in which rebels engaged in terrorism and those in which rebel groups did not use terrorism as a strategy to assess whether terrorist rebel groups fare better than non-terrorists.
Because it is not a strategy employed at random, I first explore empirically which groups use terrorism. I find, contrary to the conventional wisdom, that terrorism is not a “weapon of the weak,” nor is it more likely to be used in secessionist conflicts. It is more likely to be used against democratic states, and in more populous and richer countries.
Coming back to the initial empirical question, I find that while civil wars involving terrorism are harder to end than other wars, in those that do end, terrorist rebel groups fare no better, indeed they appear to fare worse than non-terrorist groups. Terrorists do no win.

Most Common Document Word Stems:

terror (255), group (187), terrorist (149), war (132), rebel (126), use (108), civil (84), data (64), polit (54), effect (54), outcom (49), violenc (47), conflict (46), also (46), like (43), govern (42), strategi (39), case (37), 2008 (35), civilian (35), end (35),

Author's Keywords:

terrorism effectiveness, civil war outcomes
Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners
URL:
http://www.isanet.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p414960_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Fortna, Virginia. "Do Terrorists Win? The Use of Terrorism and Civil War Outcomes 1989-2009" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA, Feb 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-28 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p414960_index.html>

APA Citation:

Fortna, V. P. , 2010-02-17 "Do Terrorists Win? The Use of Terrorism and Civil War Outcomes 1989-2009" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the Theory vs. Policy? Connecting Scholars and Practitioners, New Orleans Hilton Riverside Hotel, The Loews New Orleans Hotel, New Orleans, LA Online <APPLICATION/PDF>. 2014-11-28 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p414960_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: How effective is terrorism? This question has generated lively scholarly debate and is of obvious importance to policy makers. However, most existing studies of terrorism are not particularly well equipped to answer this question for a simple reason – they lack an appropriate comparison. This paper compares the outcomes of civil wars in which rebels engaged in terrorism and those in which rebel groups did not use terrorism as a strategy to assess whether terrorist rebel groups fare better than non-terrorists.
Because it is not a strategy employed at random, I first explore empirically which groups use terrorism. I find, contrary to the conventional wisdom, that terrorism is not a “weapon of the weak,” nor is it more likely to be used in secessionist conflicts. It is more likely to be used against democratic states, and in more populous and richer countries.
Coming back to the initial empirical question, I find that while civil wars involving terrorism are harder to end than other wars, in those that do end, terrorist rebel groups fare no better, indeed they appear to fare worse than non-terrorist groups. Terrorists do no win.


Similar Titles:
Does Terrorism Lead to Political Concession? A case study of PKK terrorism and AKP government in Turkey

The Influence of External Governments on Ethnic Groups in Conflict: Punjab as a Case Study

The Non-Combatant’s Dilemma: How Rebel Capacity and Civilian Strategies Influence Patterns of Violence During Civil Wars

Political Culture, Violence, and the Abortion Conflict: A Comparative Community Case Study


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.