Citation

Preserving the racial hierarchy by denying the importance of race: White Americans’ motivated perceptions of the importance of race in the United States

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Abstract:

In the wake of Obama’s election, the question was posed, “Does race matter in the United States?” We suggest that Whites’ response to this question may depend on their desire to maintain their racial group’s dominance (i.e., their social dominance orientation (SDO)) and their perceptions of existing racial disparities. Whereas perceptions of existing racial inequalities should logically lead to an affirmative response to this question, we suggest that this relationship may depend on Whites’ desire to maintain their racial group’s dominance. In two studies, we test the hypothesis that among high SDO Whites, the more they perceive that Whites receive unfair benefits because of their race, the more they will deny the importance of race. In Study 1, a longitudinal assessment of Whites’ perceptions of Obama’s election revealed that among high SDO Whites, the more they perceived that Whites received unfair benefits because of their race, the more they endorsed the belief that Obama’s election signaled the achievement of racial equality. In Study 2, the nature and legitimacy of racial disparities were experimentally manipulated. The study showed that among high SDO Whites, perceptions that Whites receive unfair benefits because of their race, increased endorsement of the belief that race should not be seen as important. These studies suggest that Whites may use the belief that race is not important as a means of protecting the unfair benefits Whites receive because of their race.
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Association:
Name: ISPP 33rd Annual Scientific Meeting
URL:
http://ispp.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p420132_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Schaumberg, Rebecca. and Lowery, Brian. "Preserving the racial hierarchy by denying the importance of race: White Americans’ motivated perceptions of the importance of race in the United States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 33rd Annual Scientific Meeting, Mark Hopkins Hotel, San Francisco, California, USA, <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p420132_index.html>

APA Citation:

Schaumberg, R. L. and Lowery, B. "Preserving the racial hierarchy by denying the importance of race: White Americans’ motivated perceptions of the importance of race in the United States" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ISPP 33rd Annual Scientific Meeting, Mark Hopkins Hotel, San Francisco, California, USA <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p420132_index.html

Publication Type: Paper (prepared oral presentation)
Abstract: In the wake of Obama’s election, the question was posed, “Does race matter in the United States?” We suggest that Whites’ response to this question may depend on their desire to maintain their racial group’s dominance (i.e., their social dominance orientation (SDO)) and their perceptions of existing racial disparities. Whereas perceptions of existing racial inequalities should logically lead to an affirmative response to this question, we suggest that this relationship may depend on Whites’ desire to maintain their racial group’s dominance. In two studies, we test the hypothesis that among high SDO Whites, the more they perceive that Whites receive unfair benefits because of their race, the more they will deny the importance of race. In Study 1, a longitudinal assessment of Whites’ perceptions of Obama’s election revealed that among high SDO Whites, the more they perceived that Whites received unfair benefits because of their race, the more they endorsed the belief that Obama’s election signaled the achievement of racial equality. In Study 2, the nature and legitimacy of racial disparities were experimentally manipulated. The study showed that among high SDO Whites, perceptions that Whites receive unfair benefits because of their race, increased endorsement of the belief that race should not be seen as important. These studies suggest that Whites may use the belief that race is not important as a means of protecting the unfair benefits Whites receive because of their race.


Similar Titles:
Racial Socialization as Political Socialization? The Effect of Racial Socialization on African American Perceptions of Race and Trust in Government

Perceptions of Black Clients by White Probation Officers in a Post-Racial United States: Does it Matter?


 
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