Citation

Activating Ethical Engagement in Organizations: Negotiating Ethical Tensions and Practices in a Business Ethics Initiative

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

May provides a detailed examination of an intervention he designed and conducted to enhance the ethical culture of a diversified media corporation with more than 500 employees, located in the southeastern United States. May notes that past research on communication activism has devoted little attention to business ethics. In his “Ethics at Work Initiative,” he proposes five practices of ethical engagement within an organization: dialogic communication, transparency, employee participation, ethical courage, and accountability. Through the use of pre- and post-intervention questionnaires examining employees’ perceptions of these five ethical practices, he documents increases in employees’ perceptions of the company’s commitment to these practices. In addition, working with employees through the use of focus groups, May helped to develop an organizational values statement and ethics code. Other organizational changes linked to the initiative included an ethics-oriented performance appraisal and training in ethics for new and continuing employees. Finally, on the basis of this (and other) intervention work in organizations, May explores three major dialectical tensions in organizational engagement: (a) a foundational–situational ethics tension (focusing, in part, on whether consistent ethical behaviors could be established or whether ethical behaviors need to be context specific); (b) an individual–organizational ethical tension (focusing, in part, on whether the source of ethical decision making exists at the individual or organizational level); and (c) an ethics–performance ethics tension (focusing, in part, on whether priority should be given to ethical decision making or to the organizational need for profits). May discusses how he sought to manage these tensions and, simultaneously, strengthen the ethical culture at the media company. May concludes with lessons learned from this research study about organizational communication activism.
Convention
All Academic Convention can solve the abstract management needs for any association's annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: NCA 96th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.natcom.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p421096_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

May, Steve. "Activating Ethical Engagement in Organizations: Negotiating Ethical Tensions and Practices in a Business Ethics Initiative" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p421096_index.html>

APA Citation:

May, S. "Activating Ethical Engagement in Organizations: Negotiating Ethical Tensions and Practices in a Business Ethics Initiative" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p421096_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: May provides a detailed examination of an intervention he designed and conducted to enhance the ethical culture of a diversified media corporation with more than 500 employees, located in the southeastern United States. May notes that past research on communication activism has devoted little attention to business ethics. In his “Ethics at Work Initiative,” he proposes five practices of ethical engagement within an organization: dialogic communication, transparency, employee participation, ethical courage, and accountability. Through the use of pre- and post-intervention questionnaires examining employees’ perceptions of these five ethical practices, he documents increases in employees’ perceptions of the company’s commitment to these practices. In addition, working with employees through the use of focus groups, May helped to develop an organizational values statement and ethics code. Other organizational changes linked to the initiative included an ethics-oriented performance appraisal and training in ethics for new and continuing employees. Finally, on the basis of this (and other) intervention work in organizations, May explores three major dialectical tensions in organizational engagement: (a) a foundational–situational ethics tension (focusing, in part, on whether consistent ethical behaviors could be established or whether ethical behaviors need to be context specific); (b) an individual–organizational ethical tension (focusing, in part, on whether the source of ethical decision making exists at the individual or organizational level); and (c) an ethics–performance ethics tension (focusing, in part, on whether priority should be given to ethical decision making or to the organizational need for profits). May discusses how he sought to manage these tensions and, simultaneously, strengthen the ethical culture at the media company. May concludes with lessons learned from this research study about organizational communication activism.


Similar Titles:
When Negotiating Trade Means Negotiating Difference: Ethical Engagements at the Margins of International Trade Negotiations

Work-Life Negotiation as Engaged Practice: Considering a Practice-Based Approach to Empowerment

Dialectical Tensions in Organizational Ethics: Creating Effective Ethical Engagement


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.