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Voice and Community Need: Comparing Two Approaches in a Service-Learning Course

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Abstract:

Service-learning engages students by incorporating classroom teachings with “real-life” application. Students who have been involved in service-learning show more confidence engaging in civic activities, increased concern for the common good, as well as, an enhanced interest in college and learning in general (Eyler & Giles, 1999). Yet, little is known about the ways in which various pedagogical approaches to service-learning in higher education can hinder or support these benefits. This study will examine the perceptions of student-participants in a health campaigns course before and after engaging in a group service-learning project. Two different pedagogical styles of teaching will be compared over the course of two semesters. Analysis of student surveys and reflection papers will help determine the strengths and limitations of the two pedagogical approaches. The first approach incorporates the traditional model of service-learning in higher education. In this approach, community partners are asked to come into the class and present a community need that students would then be asked to help fulfill. This approach emphasizes community needs over student voice. In the second approach, students are asked to think of community organizations that have a health need. Students then form groups and contact the organization with a plan to help fulfill a perceived community need. This model is in line with the K-12 service-learning approach developed by the Kids Consortium. This approach emphasizes student voice while partnering with a non-profit community organization. The purpose of this study is to explore students’ perceptions of group service-learning in three areas: 1) the students’ perceptions of service learning prior to the start of the project and at the end of the project, 2) overall satisfaction from contributing to a service-learning project, and 3) comparison of the two service-learning approaches.
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Association:
Name: NCA 96th Annual Convention
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http://www.natcom.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p423300_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Sullivan, Claire. "Voice and Community Need: Comparing Two Approaches in a Service-Learning Course" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA, <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p423300_index.html>

APA Citation:

Sullivan, C. "Voice and Community Need: Comparing Two Approaches in a Service-Learning Course" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the NCA 96th Annual Convention, Hilton San Francisco, San Francisco, CA <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p423300_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Abstract: Service-learning engages students by incorporating classroom teachings with “real-life” application. Students who have been involved in service-learning show more confidence engaging in civic activities, increased concern for the common good, as well as, an enhanced interest in college and learning in general (Eyler & Giles, 1999). Yet, little is known about the ways in which various pedagogical approaches to service-learning in higher education can hinder or support these benefits. This study will examine the perceptions of student-participants in a health campaigns course before and after engaging in a group service-learning project. Two different pedagogical styles of teaching will be compared over the course of two semesters. Analysis of student surveys and reflection papers will help determine the strengths and limitations of the two pedagogical approaches. The first approach incorporates the traditional model of service-learning in higher education. In this approach, community partners are asked to come into the class and present a community need that students would then be asked to help fulfill. This approach emphasizes community needs over student voice. In the second approach, students are asked to think of community organizations that have a health need. Students then form groups and contact the organization with a plan to help fulfill a perceived community need. This model is in line with the K-12 service-learning approach developed by the Kids Consortium. This approach emphasizes student voice while partnering with a non-profit community organization. The purpose of this study is to explore students’ perceptions of group service-learning in three areas: 1) the students’ perceptions of service learning prior to the start of the project and at the end of the project, 2) overall satisfaction from contributing to a service-learning project, and 3) comparison of the two service-learning approaches.


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DDL-R13 Service-Learning Goes Online: Lessons on Improving Online Learning from an Online Course Incorporating Service Learning in Students’ Communities

Comparing the Effects of Community Service and Imprisonment on Recidivism: A Matched Samples Approach

Meeting Needs of Pre-service Teachers: Outcomes of a Flipped Classroom Approach to Teaching and Learning


 
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