Citation

Making A Way Out of Walnut Way: African-American Business Women and their Community Building Efforts in Milwaukee, WI (1940s and 1950s)

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Abstract:

In the 1940s and 1950s, African-American business women owned 29% of the African-American businesses in Milwaukee, Wisconsin’s African-American Bronzeville--a very impressive number given the location and time period. They owned retail shops, restaurants, beauty shops, rooming houses, hotels, funeral homes, publishing companies, and banks. African-American business women in the city of Milwaukee used their business acumen and professional networks to provide services for the growing African-American community, forge interracial alliances, and critique the status quo that sustained de facto segregation and discrimination in the city of Milwaukee. Using three prominent African-American business women as examples, this paper explores the contests these women faced within and outside of the African-American community as they struggled to realize their own economic goals and impact their community. These women’s contributions, though largely unnoticed, are significant because they illustrate African-American women’s meshing of politics and economics—a crucial goal of the Black Freedom Struggle of the 1960s.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p429650_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Moten, Crystal. "Making A Way Out of Walnut Way: African-American Business Women and their Community Building Efforts in Milwaukee, WI (1940s and 1950s)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p429650_index.html>

APA Citation:

Moten, C. M. , 2010-09-29 "Making A Way Out of Walnut Way: African-American Business Women and their Community Building Efforts in Milwaukee, WI (1940s and 1950s)" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p429650_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the 1940s and 1950s, African-American business women owned 29% of the African-American businesses in Milwaukee, Wisconsin’s African-American Bronzeville--a very impressive number given the location and time period. They owned retail shops, restaurants, beauty shops, rooming houses, hotels, funeral homes, publishing companies, and banks. African-American business women in the city of Milwaukee used their business acumen and professional networks to provide services for the growing African-American community, forge interracial alliances, and critique the status quo that sustained de facto segregation and discrimination in the city of Milwaukee. Using three prominent African-American business women as examples, this paper explores the contests these women faced within and outside of the African-American community as they struggled to realize their own economic goals and impact their community. These women’s contributions, though largely unnoticed, are significant because they illustrate African-American women’s meshing of politics and economics—a crucial goal of the Black Freedom Struggle of the 1960s.


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