Citation

Crime by Numbers: Testing Social Disorganization Theory by Comparing Three Different Measures of Crime

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Commonly used sources of data for neighborhood level research are official crime reports (e.g., UCR or police reports) and victimization surveys (e.g., NCVS). A third indicator of crime that has been utilized is police calls for service (CFS). Though often used as an indicator of fear of crime rather than an indicator of actual criminal activity, Warner and Pierce (1993) replicated studies of social disorganization theory using CFS as the outcome. They argue that CFS more accurately represents actual crime compared to UCR and NCVS measures. Other researchers (e.g. Klinger and Bridges, 1997) argue that measurement errors weaken conclusions based on CFS; primarily because CFS do not portray self-initiated patrol activities. Though prior studies compare CFS to UCR data, we are unaware of empirical research comparing CFS, incident reports, and arrest data for neighborhoods in one city longitudinally. This project assesses the appropriateness of using CFS data within a social disorganization framework by comparing CFS, incident reports and arrest data for Reno, NV between 2006 and 2008. Additional models compare the three different crime measures as outcomes of neighborhood structural characteristics. Our data includes crime recorded from patrols to control for Klinger and Bridge’s conclusion that CFS under report crime.
Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: ASC Annual Meeting
URL:
http://www.asc41.com


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p431193_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Boggess, Lyndsay. and Maskaly, Jonathan. "Crime by Numbers: Testing Social Disorganization Theory by Comparing Three Different Measures of Crime" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, San Francisco Marriott, San Francisco, California, Nov 16, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p431193_index.html>

APA Citation:

Boggess, L. N. and Maskaly, J. , 2010-11-16 "Crime by Numbers: Testing Social Disorganization Theory by Comparing Three Different Measures of Crime" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, San Francisco Marriott, San Francisco, California <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p431193_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Commonly used sources of data for neighborhood level research are official crime reports (e.g., UCR or police reports) and victimization surveys (e.g., NCVS). A third indicator of crime that has been utilized is police calls for service (CFS). Though often used as an indicator of fear of crime rather than an indicator of actual criminal activity, Warner and Pierce (1993) replicated studies of social disorganization theory using CFS as the outcome. They argue that CFS more accurately represents actual crime compared to UCR and NCVS measures. Other researchers (e.g. Klinger and Bridges, 1997) argue that measurement errors weaken conclusions based on CFS; primarily because CFS do not portray self-initiated patrol activities. Though prior studies compare CFS to UCR data, we are unaware of empirical research comparing CFS, incident reports, and arrest data for neighborhoods in one city longitudinally. This project assesses the appropriateness of using CFS data within a social disorganization framework by comparing CFS, incident reports and arrest data for Reno, NV between 2006 and 2008. Additional models compare the three different crime measures as outcomes of neighborhood structural characteristics. Our data includes crime recorded from patrols to control for Klinger and Bridge’s conclusion that CFS under report crime.


Similar Titles:
Asian Violent Crime: A Test of Social Control Theory, Social Disorganization Theory, and Anomie/Strain Theory

Crime and Development in India: A Test of Social Disorganization and Economic Inequality Theories

Collective Efficacy, Social Capital and Social Disorganization and the Spatial Distribution of Fear of Crime and Disorder: An Empirical Test


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.