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Assessing the Impact of War on American Homicide Rates: Measuring the Brutalization Effect in New Context

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Abstract:

Capital punishment scholars have long advocated that executions lead to an increase in violence among the population. Empirical evidence suggests that this has been the case in Oklahoma (Cochrane, Chamblin, and Seth 1994; Bailey 1998) and South Carolina (King 1978), although evidence still remains mixed (Stolzenberg and D’Alession 2004; Shephard 2005) as to which states are likely to see a brutalization effect. This line of research assumes that a state sponsored execution legitimizes violence, causing an increase in homicide rates thereafter. But the impact of state sponsored violence on other situations has not been studied as exclusively in the United States, leading to the question of whether the brutalization effect is specific to executions or can be applied to other government actions. The current research is an examination of the effect of American wars on subsequent homicide rates, in an attempt to better understand the process of brutalization. Data from the Uniform Crime Report are utilized due to their longitudinal nature and time-series analyses are conducted in order to test significant changes in the homicide rate during times of war. Implications for the meaning of brutalization within varying contexts will be discussed.
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Association:
Name: ASC Annual Meeting
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http://www.asc41.com


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p432166_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Connell, Nadine. "Assessing the Impact of War on American Homicide Rates: Measuring the Brutalization Effect in New Context" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, San Francisco Marriott, San Francisco, California, Nov 17, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p432166_index.html>

APA Citation:

Connell, N. M. , 2010-11-17 "Assessing the Impact of War on American Homicide Rates: Measuring the Brutalization Effect in New Context" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the ASC Annual Meeting, San Francisco Marriott, San Francisco, California <Not Available>. 2014-11-26 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p432166_index.html

Publication Type: Conference Paper/Unpublished Manuscript
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Capital punishment scholars have long advocated that executions lead to an increase in violence among the population. Empirical evidence suggests that this has been the case in Oklahoma (Cochrane, Chamblin, and Seth 1994; Bailey 1998) and South Carolina (King 1978), although evidence still remains mixed (Stolzenberg and D’Alession 2004; Shephard 2005) as to which states are likely to see a brutalization effect. This line of research assumes that a state sponsored execution legitimizes violence, causing an increase in homicide rates thereafter. But the impact of state sponsored violence on other situations has not been studied as exclusively in the United States, leading to the question of whether the brutalization effect is specific to executions or can be applied to other government actions. The current research is an examination of the effect of American wars on subsequent homicide rates, in an attempt to better understand the process of brutalization. Data from the Uniform Crime Report are utilized due to their longitudinal nature and time-series analyses are conducted in order to test significant changes in the homicide rate during times of war. Implications for the meaning of brutalization within varying contexts will be discussed.


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