Citation

Angels of the City: African American Women and Social Mobility in Los Angeles at the Turn of the Twentieth Century

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Abstract:

This paper explores class distinctions amongst African American women in Los Angeles between 1870 and 1910. It focuses on the ways in which working-class women contributed to building the city’s black community while also highlighting the obstacles to their social mobility. Generally speaking, class distinctions amongst Black Angelenos in some ways differed from other parts of the country at the turn of the century. Many African Americans in Los Angeles did not have similar means as whites, but were nonetheless able to afford houses and even raw land for themselves and their families. Those who afforded even the most modest of accommodations were also able to accumulate some degree of wealth, even though many of them occupied working-class jobs. Land acquisition was something most Black Angelenos would not have achieved in other urban centers that attracted black migrants. Land acquisition, therefore, was one of the easiest and best ways for the black working class to gain access to the middle class. While some scholars conclude that most Black Angelenos during this time aspired to elevate their class position, and did so with relative ease, this paper shows that social mobility may not have been at the forefront of black working-class women’s lives. In de-emphasizing social mobility, this paper aims to shift the paradigm away from the black middle class and toward the largest portion of Black Angelenos – the working class.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p433083_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Campbell, Marne. "Angels of the City: African American Women and Social Mobility in Los Angeles at the Turn of the Twentieth Century" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p433083_index.html>

APA Citation:

Campbell, M. L. "Angels of the City: African American Women and Social Mobility in Los Angeles at the Turn of the Twentieth Century" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p433083_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: This paper explores class distinctions amongst African American women in Los Angeles between 1870 and 1910. It focuses on the ways in which working-class women contributed to building the city’s black community while also highlighting the obstacles to their social mobility. Generally speaking, class distinctions amongst Black Angelenos in some ways differed from other parts of the country at the turn of the century. Many African Americans in Los Angeles did not have similar means as whites, but were nonetheless able to afford houses and even raw land for themselves and their families. Those who afforded even the most modest of accommodations were also able to accumulate some degree of wealth, even though many of them occupied working-class jobs. Land acquisition was something most Black Angelenos would not have achieved in other urban centers that attracted black migrants. Land acquisition, therefore, was one of the easiest and best ways for the black working class to gain access to the middle class. While some scholars conclude that most Black Angelenos during this time aspired to elevate their class position, and did so with relative ease, this paper shows that social mobility may not have been at the forefront of black working-class women’s lives. In de-emphasizing social mobility, this paper aims to shift the paradigm away from the black middle class and toward the largest portion of Black Angelenos – the working class.


Similar Titles:
“Women Who Spoke for Themselves: An Analysis of African American Women’s Speaking Style at the Turn of the Twentieth Century.”

To Be a Lady of Refinement: Southern and Southern-Born African American Women Non-Fiction Writers and the Gendered Definitions of Class in Early Twentieth Century America

On the Threshing Floor: African American Women's Piety in the Nineteenth and Twentieth Century


 
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