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Ne'er-Do-Wells, Uncle Toms, and the Jefferson Bank Boycott: Civil Rights Struggle and Class in St. Louis, 1963-1964

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Abstract:

In “‘Ne’er-Do-Wells,’ ‘Uncle Toms,’ and the Jefferson Bank Boycott: Civil Rights Struggle and Class in Postwar St. Louis, Missouri, 1963-1964,” Clarence Lang argues that African American social movements between the 1930s and early 1970s embodied a developing black working-class politics centered on demands for fair and full employment, expanded social wages and opportunity, and equitable urban development policies. This agenda, however, produced both intraracial cooperation and conflict between black working-class activists and their middle-class allies. Using the 1963-64 mass boycott of St. Louis’s Jefferson Bank and Trust Company as a case study, Lang argues that the “heroic period” of the modern Black Freedom Movement illustrated both a heightened struggle against U.S. racial apartheid and an intensfication of class schisms among African Americans. Lang suggests that St. Louis, a border-state city, represents in microcosm larger patterns of U.S. racism and black resistance prior to the 1964 Civil Rights and 1965 Voting Rights acts.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p433084_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Lang, Clarence. "Ne'er-Do-Wells, Uncle Toms, and the Jefferson Bank Boycott: Civil Rights Struggle and Class in St. Louis, 1963-1964" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p433084_index.html>

APA Citation:

Lang, C. "Ne'er-Do-Wells, Uncle Toms, and the Jefferson Bank Boycott: Civil Rights Struggle and Class in St. Louis, 1963-1964" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p433084_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: In “‘Ne’er-Do-Wells,’ ‘Uncle Toms,’ and the Jefferson Bank Boycott: Civil Rights Struggle and Class in Postwar St. Louis, Missouri, 1963-1964,” Clarence Lang argues that African American social movements between the 1930s and early 1970s embodied a developing black working-class politics centered on demands for fair and full employment, expanded social wages and opportunity, and equitable urban development policies. This agenda, however, produced both intraracial cooperation and conflict between black working-class activists and their middle-class allies. Using the 1963-64 mass boycott of St. Louis’s Jefferson Bank and Trust Company as a case study, Lang argues that the “heroic period” of the modern Black Freedom Movement illustrated both a heightened struggle against U.S. racial apartheid and an intensfication of class schisms among African Americans. Lang suggests that St. Louis, a border-state city, represents in microcosm larger patterns of U.S. racism and black resistance prior to the 1964 Civil Rights and 1965 Voting Rights acts.


Similar Titles:
“From Garveyism to Civil Rights: The Foundation of the Civil Rights Struggle in Northeastern, North Carolina”

The Impact of Social Movements on Public Policy; an Analysis of the of the March on Washington of 1963 and the Passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964

Social Movements and Public Policy; an Analysis of the of the March on Washington of 1963 and the Passage of the Civil Rights Act of 1964


 
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