Citation

Boston’s Black Churches as Community Translators for the Civil Rights Movement, 1960s-1970s

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Abstract:

This paper examines the role that Black churches played in the area of local economic development in Boston, Massachusetts, circa 1960s and 1970s. There is relatively little information about how Black churches in this city, and generally the Northeast region of the United States, were involved in a range of economic revitalization strategies and activities at the neighborhood level. The Civil Rights Movement provided an important framework for a plethora of neighborhood revitalization activities. An examination of Black churches in Boston during the 1960s and 1970s show how the Civil Rights Movement was 'translated' in this particular city into ‘bread and butter’ and neighborhood-level issues. This does not suggest a dichotomy between such issues and support for racial equality. Rather, the paper illustrates the inseparability of the pursuit of racial equality as reflected in the Civil Rights Movement and response to the local economic needs of Blacks in Boston. The paper is based on a review of literature germane to the topic and interviews with a few individuals involved with Black churches and local economic development during the 1960s and 1970s.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p433107_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Jennings, James. "Boston’s Black Churches as Community Translators for the Civil Rights Movement, 1960s-1970s" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p433107_index.html>

APA Citation:

Jennings, J. , 2010-09-29 "Boston’s Black Churches as Community Translators for the Civil Rights Movement, 1960s-1970s" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p433107_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the role that Black churches played in the area of local economic development in Boston, Massachusetts, circa 1960s and 1970s. There is relatively little information about how Black churches in this city, and generally the Northeast region of the United States, were involved in a range of economic revitalization strategies and activities at the neighborhood level. The Civil Rights Movement provided an important framework for a plethora of neighborhood revitalization activities. An examination of Black churches in Boston during the 1960s and 1970s show how the Civil Rights Movement was 'translated' in this particular city into ‘bread and butter’ and neighborhood-level issues. This does not suggest a dichotomy between such issues and support for racial equality. Rather, the paper illustrates the inseparability of the pursuit of racial equality as reflected in the Civil Rights Movement and response to the local economic needs of Blacks in Boston. The paper is based on a review of literature germane to the topic and interviews with a few individuals involved with Black churches and local economic development during the 1960s and 1970s.


Similar Titles:
“The Masses Were Not Members: Black Church Women and their Transformative Role in the U.S. Civil Rights Movement”

Gay Rights Movements and the Misappropriation of Black Civil Rights Movements

Cultural Foundations of the Civil Rights Movements: The Role of the Black Church.


 
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