Citation

Mothering in Chains: Reflections on Black Motherhood in Post 18th Century America

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Abstract:

Modern conceptions of motherhood are often conflated with notions of nuclear families that include one mother, one father and a stationary home with the man at the "head of the household." However, for enslaved women throughout the Americas this was far from the truth. Enslaved women were considered little more than wet-nurses and breeders. In fact much of their worth both monetary and social, was determined by their ability to reproduce. Despite enslaved women's inability to replicate white slave-owning familial structures enslaved women continually resisted forced-mating and struggled to create their own version of family and womanhood in the face of the "cult of true womanhood." Through the semi-fictitious stories of Dessa Rose and Beloved I examine enslaved women's dual identities of mother and woman in post 18th century America. This paper attempts to expand the body of research on enslaved mothers and the depictions of womanhood in Black American communities already produced by scholars such as Patricia Hill Collins, bell hooks and Dorothy Roberts. This work is particularly concerned with a construction of black motherhood and womanhood that does not fit the framework of the cult of true womanhood; the multiple ways black women recreate familial structures despite their disenfranchised positions and the degree to which these constructions have carried over into 20th and 21st century constructions of black womanhood and black motherhood in particular.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p433515_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Brown, Layla. "Mothering in Chains: Reflections on Black Motherhood in Post 18th Century America" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p433515_index.html>

APA Citation:

Brown, L. D. , 2010-09-29 "Mothering in Chains: Reflections on Black Motherhood in Post 18th Century America" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p433515_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Modern conceptions of motherhood are often conflated with notions of nuclear families that include one mother, one father and a stationary home with the man at the "head of the household." However, for enslaved women throughout the Americas this was far from the truth. Enslaved women were considered little more than wet-nurses and breeders. In fact much of their worth both monetary and social, was determined by their ability to reproduce. Despite enslaved women's inability to replicate white slave-owning familial structures enslaved women continually resisted forced-mating and struggled to create their own version of family and womanhood in the face of the "cult of true womanhood." Through the semi-fictitious stories of Dessa Rose and Beloved I examine enslaved women's dual identities of mother and woman in post 18th century America. This paper attempts to expand the body of research on enslaved mothers and the depictions of womanhood in Black American communities already produced by scholars such as Patricia Hill Collins, bell hooks and Dorothy Roberts. This work is particularly concerned with a construction of black motherhood and womanhood that does not fit the framework of the cult of true womanhood; the multiple ways black women recreate familial structures despite their disenfranchised positions and the degree to which these constructions have carried over into 20th and 21st century constructions of black womanhood and black motherhood in particular.


Similar Titles:
Of African Descent: Negro, to Black and Back: Post-Black identity in the 21st Century.

Of African Descent: Negro, to Black and Back: Post-Black identity in the 21st Century.

Of African Descent: Negro, to Black and Back: Post-Black identity in the 21st Century.

Of African Descent: Negro, to Black and Back: Post-Black identity in the 21st Century.

Natural Mothers: Catholic Mothers and the Breastfeeding Movement in Post-World War II America


 
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