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A Remedy for the Last Hired, First Fired: The “Young Turks’” Critique of the New Deal Economic Policy, 1933 to 1939

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Abstract:

This case study examines the positions of the "Young Turks" on political organization, labor, the New Deal and escalating rates of unemployment experienced by African-American workers between 1933 and the build-up to World War II. The “Young Turks” included rising stars among African-American intellectuals such as Horace Mann Bond (history), Abram Harris (economics), Ralph Bunche (political science) and the poet and literary critic Sterling Brown. Ira De Augustine Reid, (sociology), Charles Houston (law), and E. Franklin Frazier (sociology) completed the ranks of this self-confident avant-garde. As early as 1933, the Young Turks offered an alternative vision of race relations and economic empowerment. Increasingly, African-American audiences responded favorably to their vision. Their ideas also gained cache with important, mainstream audiences.

The Young Turks sustained their critique of the NAACP and the New Deal into the late 1930s and with it, their identity and reputations as a cadre of brilliant gadflies. This case study offers a lens into continuity and change in an era marked by the mass migration of African Americans to southern, then, northern cities. Beginning as early as 1920, Anderson (1988) argued the era also witnessed the massive displacement of African-American workers whose needs New Deal legislation and programs did little to address. The effectiveness of Young Turk agitation in promoting change in U. S. economic policy and lifting the employment rates of African-American workers is a central them of this case studyr.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435050_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Ray, Louis. "A Remedy for the Last Hired, First Fired: The “Young Turks’” Critique of the New Deal Economic Policy, 1933 to 1939" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435050_index.html>

APA Citation:

Ray, L. , 2010-09-29 "A Remedy for the Last Hired, First Fired: The “Young Turks’” Critique of the New Deal Economic Policy, 1933 to 1939" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435050_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This case study examines the positions of the "Young Turks" on political organization, labor, the New Deal and escalating rates of unemployment experienced by African-American workers between 1933 and the build-up to World War II. The “Young Turks” included rising stars among African-American intellectuals such as Horace Mann Bond (history), Abram Harris (economics), Ralph Bunche (political science) and the poet and literary critic Sterling Brown. Ira De Augustine Reid, (sociology), Charles Houston (law), and E. Franklin Frazier (sociology) completed the ranks of this self-confident avant-garde. As early as 1933, the Young Turks offered an alternative vision of race relations and economic empowerment. Increasingly, African-American audiences responded favorably to their vision. Their ideas also gained cache with important, mainstream audiences.

The Young Turks sustained their critique of the NAACP and the New Deal into the late 1930s and with it, their identity and reputations as a cadre of brilliant gadflies. This case study offers a lens into continuity and change in an era marked by the mass migration of African Americans to southern, then, northern cities. Beginning as early as 1920, Anderson (1988) argued the era also witnessed the massive displacement of African-American workers whose needs New Deal legislation and programs did little to address. The effectiveness of Young Turk agitation in promoting change in U. S. economic policy and lifting the employment rates of African-American workers is a central them of this case studyr.


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