Citation

"Eat To Live:" Alternative Economies fluid by Dietary Lifestyles amongst African-American Islamic Communities."

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Abstract:

For years, African-American women in Islamic communities have collectively worked to uphold and support the local economic prowess of not only their communities, they also contributed to the finances of their individual households. In popular memory, the "bean pie" was originally utilized by members of the Nation of Islam to support the financial efforts of building funds, community programming and various fundraisers in their respective locales. For many, the bean pie remains at the helm of black political memory as an icon of African-American cultural equity. This cultural equity is rooted in messages of economic divestment from racist and economically oppressive institutions among the many imagined pathways to freedom. Through this lens, the bean pie itself can be viewed is a symbol of racial uplift, and of economic empowerment.
Anyone who has tasted one of these famous treats is aware that it is comprised of sugar and navy beans among other secret and not-so-secret ingredients. But what else is contained in them? How are messages of racial uplift and economic freedom baked into the very texture of this distinctly African-American, distinctly Muslim food? This paper will investigate connections between popular cultural equity and alternative economies created as a result of culturally recognized confectionary expertise among African-American Muslims. The lack of finances and non-Western ways of thinking about what can be a commodity, in addition to being introduced to Islamic commentary on economic behavior will also be investigated; for these aspects have also greatly informed how African-American Muslim communities have viewed alternative pathways of developing "economy" among themselves and with others.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435058_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Carter, Youssef. ""Eat To Live:" Alternative Economies fluid by Dietary Lifestyles amongst African-American Islamic Communities."" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435058_index.html>

APA Citation:

Carter, Y. J. , 2010-09-29 ""Eat To Live:" Alternative Economies fluid by Dietary Lifestyles amongst African-American Islamic Communities."" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435058_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: For years, African-American women in Islamic communities have collectively worked to uphold and support the local economic prowess of not only their communities, they also contributed to the finances of their individual households. In popular memory, the "bean pie" was originally utilized by members of the Nation of Islam to support the financial efforts of building funds, community programming and various fundraisers in their respective locales. For many, the bean pie remains at the helm of black political memory as an icon of African-American cultural equity. This cultural equity is rooted in messages of economic divestment from racist and economically oppressive institutions among the many imagined pathways to freedom. Through this lens, the bean pie itself can be viewed is a symbol of racial uplift, and of economic empowerment.
Anyone who has tasted one of these famous treats is aware that it is comprised of sugar and navy beans among other secret and not-so-secret ingredients. But what else is contained in them? How are messages of racial uplift and economic freedom baked into the very texture of this distinctly African-American, distinctly Muslim food? This paper will investigate connections between popular cultural equity and alternative economies created as a result of culturally recognized confectionary expertise among African-American Muslims. The lack of finances and non-Western ways of thinking about what can be a commodity, in addition to being introduced to Islamic commentary on economic behavior will also be investigated; for these aspects have also greatly informed how African-American Muslim communities have viewed alternative pathways of developing "economy" among themselves and with others.


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