Citation

Slave Clandestine Activity as Black Economic Empowerment: Eastern North Carolina, 1775-1860

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Abstract:

Enslaved individuals exercised the choice to be “free” in many different ways in revolutionary and antebellum eastern North Carolina. Along with the commonly known methods of self-determination – fight and flight – were less distinguishable actions including stealing, trading, looting; or, networking among the marginal members of plantation society such as poor whites and yeoman farmers, Native Americans and free blacks. The purpose of this presentation is to examine these actions, defined as slave clandestine activity or economy, in an attempt to highlight the agency exhibited by slaves as they stole plantation stores for subsistence or earned a profit using the skills learned and utilized on the plantation. Essentially, this presentation seeks to elaborate on the definition of slave clandestine activity as explained by scholars including John Hope Franklin and Loren Schweninger. Why did slaves in eastern North Carolina choose to utilize clandestine tactics for survival or advancement? How did clandestine activity relate to both runaway hideouts and plantation society in the region? More importantly, how is clandestine activity viewed as an assertion of economic independence and empowerment within the context of eastern North Carolina’s plantation society? Slave narratives, slave codes, and planter memoirs will be studied to give an analysis of black economic empowerment among enslaved individuals in revolutionary and antebellum eastern North Carolina.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435105_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Nevius, Marcus. "Slave Clandestine Activity as Black Economic Empowerment: Eastern North Carolina, 1775-1860" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435105_index.html>

APA Citation:

Nevius, M. P. , 2010-09-29 "Slave Clandestine Activity as Black Economic Empowerment: Eastern North Carolina, 1775-1860" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435105_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Enslaved individuals exercised the choice to be “free” in many different ways in revolutionary and antebellum eastern North Carolina. Along with the commonly known methods of self-determination – fight and flight – were less distinguishable actions including stealing, trading, looting; or, networking among the marginal members of plantation society such as poor whites and yeoman farmers, Native Americans and free blacks. The purpose of this presentation is to examine these actions, defined as slave clandestine activity or economy, in an attempt to highlight the agency exhibited by slaves as they stole plantation stores for subsistence or earned a profit using the skills learned and utilized on the plantation. Essentially, this presentation seeks to elaborate on the definition of slave clandestine activity as explained by scholars including John Hope Franklin and Loren Schweninger. Why did slaves in eastern North Carolina choose to utilize clandestine tactics for survival or advancement? How did clandestine activity relate to both runaway hideouts and plantation society in the region? More importantly, how is clandestine activity viewed as an assertion of economic independence and empowerment within the context of eastern North Carolina’s plantation society? Slave narratives, slave codes, and planter memoirs will be studied to give an analysis of black economic empowerment among enslaved individuals in revolutionary and antebellum eastern North Carolina.


Similar Titles:
Slave Resistance in Eastern North Carolina During the Civil War

Black Women and American Marronage: An Examination of Eastern North Carolina

"Josephine Napoleon Leary: A Story of Black Economic Empowerment in Eastern North Carolina"


 
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