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Protesting and Reshaping Politics While Overcoming the Legacy of Fear of Racial Pogroms in 1930s East St. Louis, Illinois

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Abstract:

"If a Negro is sponsoring some progressive movement to tear down some prejudice . . . white people will say ‘this young man is trying to start a race riot,’” said a local black attorney. Like African Americans across the United States, black people in East St. Louis, Illinois, engaged in protests and politics and worked to restore and expand their civil rights. In ways similar to what historians documented elsewhere, black East St. Louisan life and history mirrored the African American experience. For example, black townspeople fashioned a wide array of actions, from joining Communist Party-sponsored unemployment marches to organizing locals of Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) unions. The majority of black East St. Louisans aligned with the Democratic Party in 1928, but like most African Americans in 1936, black townspeople became unshakeable supporters of President Franklin Delano’s New Deal and his Democratic Party coalition. Paradoxically, in a city controlled by the Democratic Party, black residents protested the racial discrimination and segregation that came with the very New Deal programs that aided them in surviving the Great Depression. Black East St. Louisans, however, had to develop their politics and social activism carefully while receiving threats of the possibility of massive anti-black violence from city political and business leaders who wanted black townspeople neither to forget their place in the racial hierarchy in a rigidly segregated city in a northern state nor to attempt to create a black political machine.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435108_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Lumpkins, Charles. "Protesting and Reshaping Politics While Overcoming the Legacy of Fear of Racial Pogroms in 1930s East St. Louis, Illinois" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435108_index.html>

APA Citation:

Lumpkins, C. "Protesting and Reshaping Politics While Overcoming the Legacy of Fear of Racial Pogroms in 1930s East St. Louis, Illinois" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435108_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: "If a Negro is sponsoring some progressive movement to tear down some prejudice . . . white people will say ‘this young man is trying to start a race riot,’” said a local black attorney. Like African Americans across the United States, black people in East St. Louis, Illinois, engaged in protests and politics and worked to restore and expand their civil rights. In ways similar to what historians documented elsewhere, black East St. Louisan life and history mirrored the African American experience. For example, black townspeople fashioned a wide array of actions, from joining Communist Party-sponsored unemployment marches to organizing locals of Congress of Industrial Organizations (CIO) unions. The majority of black East St. Louisans aligned with the Democratic Party in 1928, but like most African Americans in 1936, black townspeople became unshakeable supporters of President Franklin Delano’s New Deal and his Democratic Party coalition. Paradoxically, in a city controlled by the Democratic Party, black residents protested the racial discrimination and segregation that came with the very New Deal programs that aided them in surviving the Great Depression. Black East St. Louisans, however, had to develop their politics and social activism carefully while receiving threats of the possibility of massive anti-black violence from city political and business leaders who wanted black townspeople neither to forget their place in the racial hierarchy in a rigidly segregated city in a northern state nor to attempt to create a black political machine.


Similar Titles:
The Hybrid Rebel and North American Politics: Louis Riel and the Racial Struggles of Late 19th Century Canadian Political Development

The Legacy of Deracialization: Racial Politics in Newark, NJ in the Aftermath of Cory Booker

The East St. Louis Pogrom of July 1917 To Destroy Black Political Activism


 
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