Citation

Consuming Herself: New Negro Women and Sexual Self-Determination in the Marketplace

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

It was through the purchase of clothes, cosmetics, race records, and other luxuries and entertainments, as much as through travel, work and politics, that African American migrants transformed themselves from rural rubes or small-town ingénues to urban, sophisticated, undaunted New Negroes. As much as any other factor, the clothes and the cosmetics, the music and the nightlife helped early twentieth-century black people forge new identities, develop new attitudes, and shape their destinies in this period. Although, as the New Negro progressives constantly lamented, newly urban African Americans were most often employed in the dirtiest, most dangerous, and lowest paying industrial and domestic jobs at the bottom of the employment scale, they nevertheless made more money than ever before. The migrants had a new disposable income to spend, and, despite their hardships and the disapproval of people like E. Franklin Frazier and Elise Johnson McDougald, they spent a great deal of it enjoying their new lives in the city and re-creating themselves as New Negroes.

This paper will discuss the politics of gender and self-determination that impacted the New Negro identity transformation and the consumption patterns that developed around and through that process, particularly as they affected African American women. As they sought to remake themselves and take advantage of the era’s vaunted opportunities to change their lives, black women encountered an early-twentieth-century combination of racism and sexism that operated intra-racially as well as interracially. This paper will focus on the market-oriented, discursive strategies African American women developed to confront this complex oppression.
Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435114_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Chapman, Erin D.. "Consuming Herself: New Negro Women and Sexual Self-Determination in the Marketplace" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435114_index.html>

APA Citation:

Chapman, E. , 2010-09-29 "Consuming Herself: New Negro Women and Sexual Self-Determination in the Marketplace" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435114_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: It was through the purchase of clothes, cosmetics, race records, and other luxuries and entertainments, as much as through travel, work and politics, that African American migrants transformed themselves from rural rubes or small-town ingénues to urban, sophisticated, undaunted New Negroes. As much as any other factor, the clothes and the cosmetics, the music and the nightlife helped early twentieth-century black people forge new identities, develop new attitudes, and shape their destinies in this period. Although, as the New Negro progressives constantly lamented, newly urban African Americans were most often employed in the dirtiest, most dangerous, and lowest paying industrial and domestic jobs at the bottom of the employment scale, they nevertheless made more money than ever before. The migrants had a new disposable income to spend, and, despite their hardships and the disapproval of people like E. Franklin Frazier and Elise Johnson McDougald, they spent a great deal of it enjoying their new lives in the city and re-creating themselves as New Negroes.

This paper will discuss the politics of gender and self-determination that impacted the New Negro identity transformation and the consumption patterns that developed around and through that process, particularly as they affected African American women. As they sought to remake themselves and take advantage of the era’s vaunted opportunities to change their lives, black women encountered an early-twentieth-century combination of racism and sexism that operated intra-racially as well as interracially. This paper will focus on the market-oriented, discursive strategies African American women developed to confront this complex oppression.


Similar Titles:
Self-Esteem and “At Risk” Women: Determinants and Relevance to Sexual and HIV Risk Behaviors

Undergraduates’ Perceptions of Sexual Self-Actualization, Self-Determination, and University Programming Needs

Do It Yourself:‬ The Relationship Between Masturbation, Sexual Assertiveness, and Positive Sexual Self-Concept for Women

Feminism in the bedroom: An inclusive approach to measuring feminist self-identification and sexuality among sexually active women.


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.