Citation

The Women's Division: Domestic Workers and the St. Louis Urban League, 1930-49

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Denied membership in organized labor and ignored by New Deal labor legislation and state and federal wartime protections, black women domestics of St. Louis used a variety of community institutions and voluntary organizations to support their efforts to organize and establish a collective relationship with employers. To rid household work of the stench of slavery, Gateway City domestics helped create a code of set hours, wages, conditions, and terms across a fifteen-year period. Building coalition primarily with the local Urban League, black women workers expanded the scope of the organization's focus on presenting an industrious model black workforce. As they redefined their work by challenging employer abuse and authority and pushing their case to the heart of debates about the broader public sphere's responsibility for labor relations, capitalism, and black women's survival, domestics transformed urban politics. They formed an integral part of the interracial, cross-class coalition groups that emerged and became central players in reform strategies. The move toward standardization, an outgrowth of Progressive era reforms, was by no means solely a middle and upper class phenomenon. Quite the contrary, black working-class women had a direct hand in shaping domestic work reform and as a result forged their own New Deal.
Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435117_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Ervin, Keona. "The Women's Division: Domestic Workers and the St. Louis Urban League, 1930-49" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435117_index.html>

APA Citation:

Ervin, K. "The Women's Division: Domestic Workers and the St. Louis Urban League, 1930-49" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435117_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: Denied membership in organized labor and ignored by New Deal labor legislation and state and federal wartime protections, black women domestics of St. Louis used a variety of community institutions and voluntary organizations to support their efforts to organize and establish a collective relationship with employers. To rid household work of the stench of slavery, Gateway City domestics helped create a code of set hours, wages, conditions, and terms across a fifteen-year period. Building coalition primarily with the local Urban League, black women workers expanded the scope of the organization's focus on presenting an industrious model black workforce. As they redefined their work by challenging employer abuse and authority and pushing their case to the heart of debates about the broader public sphere's responsibility for labor relations, capitalism, and black women's survival, domestics transformed urban politics. They formed an integral part of the interracial, cross-class coalition groups that emerged and became central players in reform strategies. The move toward standardization, an outgrowth of Progressive era reforms, was by no means solely a middle and upper class phenomenon. Quite the contrary, black working-class women had a direct hand in shaping domestic work reform and as a result forged their own New Deal.


Similar Titles:
Working Women or Women Workers? The Women's Trade Union League and the Transformation of the American Constitutional Order

“We Were Not the Typical Women in the NOW Movement”: Black Women as Members of the League of Revolutionary Black Workers, 1969-1971


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.