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Way Up North in Louisville: African American Migration in Louisville, Kentucky, 1930-1970

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Abstract:

My paper examines the era of the Second Great Migration (1930-1970), which in large measure remains unexplored. "Way Up North in Louisville" reconceptualizes the relationship of African Americans to the South and urban landscapes in general. I argue that Black migrants in Louisville consciously chose to remain in the South because they viewed it as "Home." Ultimately, migrants defined teh South as "Home" in a variety of overlapping ways: as a site of resistance, as a site of oppression, and as a source of collective identity. The political, social and economic actions of Black migrants in Louisville illustrate the ways in which they claimed the South and "the city" as their own, while working to make it a "safe space" for African Americans to live. In doing so, "Way Up North in Louisville" points to different ways African American migrants defined the South and their own Southerness. Blacks defined Louisville in terms of oppression, resistance and as Home. Though described as a "Progressive City" within the South, blues singers such as Clara Smith pointed out that it is in Louisville that the South began. Her 1925 "L. & N. Blues" claims that the South was a region that was not so much defined geographically as it was culturally or by its politics of oppression. Others such as Angela Davis argued, "'Home' is evocatively and metaphorically represented as the South, conceptualized as the territorial location of historical site of resistance ot white supremacy. . ." In defining the South as "Home," Black migrants demonstrated that neither their lives, nor their conceptions of the South were wholly defined by racial oppression or their resistance to it; rather, they infused the South with a meaning all their own.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435118_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Adams, Luther. "Way Up North in Louisville: African American Migration in Louisville, Kentucky, 1930-1970" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435118_index.html>

APA Citation:

Adams, L. "Way Up North in Louisville: African American Migration in Louisville, Kentucky, 1930-1970" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435118_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: My paper examines the era of the Second Great Migration (1930-1970), which in large measure remains unexplored. "Way Up North in Louisville" reconceptualizes the relationship of African Americans to the South and urban landscapes in general. I argue that Black migrants in Louisville consciously chose to remain in the South because they viewed it as "Home." Ultimately, migrants defined teh South as "Home" in a variety of overlapping ways: as a site of resistance, as a site of oppression, and as a source of collective identity. The political, social and economic actions of Black migrants in Louisville illustrate the ways in which they claimed the South and "the city" as their own, while working to make it a "safe space" for African Americans to live. In doing so, "Way Up North in Louisville" points to different ways African American migrants defined the South and their own Southerness. Blacks defined Louisville in terms of oppression, resistance and as Home. Though described as a "Progressive City" within the South, blues singers such as Clara Smith pointed out that it is in Louisville that the South began. Her 1925 "L. & N. Blues" claims that the South was a region that was not so much defined geographically as it was culturally or by its politics of oppression. Others such as Angela Davis argued, "'Home' is evocatively and metaphorically represented as the South, conceptualized as the territorial location of historical site of resistance ot white supremacy. . ." In defining the South as "Home," Black migrants demonstrated that neither their lives, nor their conceptions of the South were wholly defined by racial oppression or their resistance to it; rather, they infused the South with a meaning all their own.


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Ties that Bind: African and Native American Women in African-American History An Examination of the Tuscarora and African- Americans of Eastern North Carolina


 
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