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A. Philip Randolph, the Messenger, and the Women’s Movement during World War I

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Abstract:

This paper examines A. Philip Randolph’s early support for women’s suffrage and the Messenger’s promotion of black women’s health and beauty as a specific manifestation of his distinct conception of social justice. In backing both the right to vote and access to birth control, Randolph acted in accord with a specific conception of social justice that he began to devise in the war years. He insisted that all citizens should be afforded fair access to the economic, civic, social, and political benefits of modern society because all races and classes had contributed to humanity’s collective development. While most socialists continued to assert a basic labor theory of value, Randolph adopted a more egalitarian outlook that emphasized open and participatory democracy and argued that all Americans citizens were entitled to certain fundamental rights that the government could act to protect but could not nullify. His vocal support of women’s suffrage and birth control are early representations of the political philosophy that would guide core features of Randolph’s social activism and organization in the years to come.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435182_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Bynum, Cornelius. "A. Philip Randolph, the Messenger, and the Women’s Movement during World War I" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435182_index.html>

APA Citation:

Bynum, C. "A. Philip Randolph, the Messenger, and the Women’s Movement during World War I" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435182_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: This paper examines A. Philip Randolph’s early support for women’s suffrage and the Messenger’s promotion of black women’s health and beauty as a specific manifestation of his distinct conception of social justice. In backing both the right to vote and access to birth control, Randolph acted in accord with a specific conception of social justice that he began to devise in the war years. He insisted that all citizens should be afforded fair access to the economic, civic, social, and political benefits of modern society because all races and classes had contributed to humanity’s collective development. While most socialists continued to assert a basic labor theory of value, Randolph adopted a more egalitarian outlook that emphasized open and participatory democracy and argued that all Americans citizens were entitled to certain fundamental rights that the government could act to protect but could not nullify. His vocal support of women’s suffrage and birth control are early representations of the political philosophy that would guide core features of Randolph’s social activism and organization in the years to come.


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