Citation

Claiming Cultural Capital--BookMarks: Reading in Black and White

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Abstract:

This paper takes the thesis from my recently published book, BookMarks: Reading in Black and White, and focuses on the ways in which the stature of blacks was attached to the kind of books they read. Black writers and the ‘race men and women’ of the twentieth century understood their social and economic positions could be intimately attached to their association with certain kinds of books—those that distinguished them as culturally elite and distinctive. In order to achieve this intimacy between bodies and books, and to receive the cultural capital that association might dispense, those writers of memoirs and autobiographies included in these narratives, lists of books read in their formative years. These booklists expose their deliberate efforts to glean a favorable social status, one that meant their own value—their ‘cultural capital’ would borrow from the classical association of books that marked them as deserving of the highest social standing they might achieve, despite and within their race. This meant that the booklists of blacks were composed of white writers. This talk will explore the history and practice of marking oneself with a book, carried cover-out or included as an autobiographical note, and the purchase in this deliberate conduct.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435237_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Holloway, Karla. "Claiming Cultural Capital--BookMarks: Reading in Black and White" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435237_index.html>

APA Citation:

Holloway, K. F. , 2010-09-29 "Claiming Cultural Capital--BookMarks: Reading in Black and White" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435237_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper takes the thesis from my recently published book, BookMarks: Reading in Black and White, and focuses on the ways in which the stature of blacks was attached to the kind of books they read. Black writers and the ‘race men and women’ of the twentieth century understood their social and economic positions could be intimately attached to their association with certain kinds of books—those that distinguished them as culturally elite and distinctive. In order to achieve this intimacy between bodies and books, and to receive the cultural capital that association might dispense, those writers of memoirs and autobiographies included in these narratives, lists of books read in their formative years. These booklists expose their deliberate efforts to glean a favorable social status, one that meant their own value—their ‘cultural capital’ would borrow from the classical association of books that marked them as deserving of the highest social standing they might achieve, despite and within their race. This meant that the booklists of blacks were composed of white writers. This talk will explore the history and practice of marking oneself with a book, carried cover-out or included as an autobiographical note, and the purchase in this deliberate conduct.


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Black Capitalism and White Wealth: Race, Community, Capital Formation and Jim Crow Economics/Segregationist Business Models

Can White Be Black?: Cultural Work in the Reality TV Series, Black. White.


 
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