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African American Scholars, African Nationalism, and Cold War Politics, 1945-1963

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Abstract:

From the late 1940s to the early 1960s, black American activist scholars navigated the turbulent waters between Cold War politics and African nationalism in diverse ways as they sought to balance personal, institutional, and political goals. Historian Rayford Logan and sociologist E. Franklin Frazier sought to establish an African studies program at Howard University with foundation aid by convincing US State Department and foundation officials that they were detached scholars who were objective and unemotional about African nationalist movements. One way they did this was by adopting the position that African colonies were not ready for independence. By contrast, anthropologist St. Clair Drake of Roosevelt University, who also sought foundation funding for African studies, advocated immediate independence for African colonies and actively fought the State Department when it sought to exclude Kenyan nationalists from travel or study in the United States. Horace Mann Bond, president of Lincoln University, while uncompromisingly calling for immediate independence for African colonies, helped lead the American Society for African Culture, which received Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) funding. Despite the divergences in the political views and actions of Logan, Frazier, Drake, and Bond, they all shared an anti-Communist perspective, which brought them into conflict with the leftist Council on African Affairs. While other historians have differentiated Communist from anti-Communist black activist scholars, little has been written about the divergent actions and views of anti-Communist black scholars. Based on archival research in the papers of the above-named scholars, this study will help to complicate our understanding of the diverse ways that black scholars pursued institutional, political, and personal goals during the early Cold War.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435427_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Gershenhorn, Jerry. "African American Scholars, African Nationalism, and Cold War Politics, 1945-1963" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435427_index.html>

APA Citation:

Gershenhorn, J. , 2010-09-29 "African American Scholars, African Nationalism, and Cold War Politics, 1945-1963" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435427_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: From the late 1940s to the early 1960s, black American activist scholars navigated the turbulent waters between Cold War politics and African nationalism in diverse ways as they sought to balance personal, institutional, and political goals. Historian Rayford Logan and sociologist E. Franklin Frazier sought to establish an African studies program at Howard University with foundation aid by convincing US State Department and foundation officials that they were detached scholars who were objective and unemotional about African nationalist movements. One way they did this was by adopting the position that African colonies were not ready for independence. By contrast, anthropologist St. Clair Drake of Roosevelt University, who also sought foundation funding for African studies, advocated immediate independence for African colonies and actively fought the State Department when it sought to exclude Kenyan nationalists from travel or study in the United States. Horace Mann Bond, president of Lincoln University, while uncompromisingly calling for immediate independence for African colonies, helped lead the American Society for African Culture, which received Central Intelligence Agency (CIA) funding. Despite the divergences in the political views and actions of Logan, Frazier, Drake, and Bond, they all shared an anti-Communist perspective, which brought them into conflict with the leftist Council on African Affairs. While other historians have differentiated Communist from anti-Communist black activist scholars, little has been written about the divergent actions and views of anti-Communist black scholars. Based on archival research in the papers of the above-named scholars, this study will help to complicate our understanding of the diverse ways that black scholars pursued institutional, political, and personal goals during the early Cold War.


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"To Live and Work in Africa:" African American Women, Cold War Travels and Transnational Politics in Ghana, 1957-1963

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Freedom in Laughter: Dick Gregory, Bill Cosby, and the Politics of Representation in African American Comedy, 1963-65

A Quantitative Comparison of Major Democratic National Convention Speeches by High-Profile African American Political Leaders: How Is Race Treated?


 
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