Citation

America’s First Biracial-Black President: Obama and the One Drop Rule

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Abstract:

As Barack Obama took the oath of office on January 20, 2009, many hailed America’s forty-fourth president as “the first Black President.” Although Obama has acknowledged his biracial ethnicity, having a White mother and an African father, he is still viewed as a Black man in America. This perception of Obama as a Black man despite his biracial ethnicity is a manifestation of the American racial paradigm which has historically only allowed for two categories of citizenship when identifying one’s race; white or/non-white. The idea that one can be biracial is a concept that still has not been fully articulated in US society. While the idea of a biracial ethnicity has been embraced by some it has not reached the point of complete acceptance. By identifying Obama as America’s “first Black president,” it is apparent that the idea of “one drop” of Black blood is still equated with blackness. At the same time, it is a reflection of the fact that the idea of a multiracial identity has not been fully accepted nor articulated in the United States despite the fact that its citizens have elected the country’s first “black-biracial president.”
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435505_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Crisci, Erika. "America’s First Biracial-Black President: Obama and the One Drop Rule" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435505_index.html>

APA Citation:

Crisci, E. P. "America’s First Biracial-Black President: Obama and the One Drop Rule" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435505_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: As Barack Obama took the oath of office on January 20, 2009, many hailed America’s forty-fourth president as “the first Black President.” Although Obama has acknowledged his biracial ethnicity, having a White mother and an African father, he is still viewed as a Black man in America. This perception of Obama as a Black man despite his biracial ethnicity is a manifestation of the American racial paradigm which has historically only allowed for two categories of citizenship when identifying one’s race; white or/non-white. The idea that one can be biracial is a concept that still has not been fully articulated in US society. While the idea of a biracial ethnicity has been embraced by some it has not reached the point of complete acceptance. By identifying Obama as America’s “first Black president,” it is apparent that the idea of “one drop” of Black blood is still equated with blackness. At the same time, it is a reflection of the fact that the idea of a multiracial identity has not been fully accepted nor articulated in the United States despite the fact that its citizens have elected the country’s first “black-biracial president.”


Similar Titles:
The First Black President? Cross-racial Perceptions of Barack Obama’s Race

The Black President and His First Lady’s Phallus: Michelle Obama’s Queer Performance

Voters and Race in 2008: Obama as the First Black President

Obama as the First Black US President: Voter Perceptions of Race


 
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