Citation

In Pursuit of Self: The Identity of an American President and Cosmopolitanism

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

I Come to Berlin as so many of my countrymen have come before; although tonight, I speak to you not as a candidate for President, but as a citizen-a proud citizen of the United States, and a fellow citizen of the World.

Barack H. Obama, Berlin, July 24, 2008

Obama has much more in common with 18 to 29 year olds, a group I call the First Global Citizens…Having roots in Kenya, lived in Indonesia and raised in poly-ehtnic Hawaii, Obama’s background makes him more of a world citizen than perhaps any other president.

John Zogby, March, 2009

The forty-fourth President of the United States, Barack Hussein Obama, projects an identity that is multiple and fragmented as opposed to one that is essentialist and unitary. This may be equated with a type of philosophical cosmopolitanism that accepts broad notions of self-identity but neither rejects nor eliminates subjective [racial] identities such as “blackness.” In nearly every public setting that the issue of his race has been introduced, Barack Obama, although he routinely self-identifies as an African American, continuously acknowledges his mixed race heritage and the experience of being born of a “white” mother, a “black” father, and raised by his “white” grandparents; stating in his autobiography that, “I can’t even hold up my experience as being somehow representative of the black American experience.” Obama makes this statement in the same breath in which he claims to be writing about his life as a “black American.” This essay argues that American President Barack Obama’s self identity, as based on his writings, speeches, and public statements, may be characterized as hybridized or “fragmented” as opposed to one that is “unitary or essentialist.” Further, the Obama phenomenon has taken place in the context of a particular moment in recent American history known as the post-civil rights era or what some have prematurely defined as “post-racial” America. Particularly, between the years of the Supreme Court decision in Loving vs. Virginia in 1967 and the 2000 census. Obama as an individual subject manages to occupy a range of racial identity positionings that are partial, contradictory, and strategic; that may be best understood, in a particular historical context, in relation to philosophical cosmopolitanism.
Convention
Convention is an application service for managing large or small academic conferences, annual meetings, and other types of events!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435506_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Williams, Hettie. "In Pursuit of Self: The Identity of an American President and Cosmopolitanism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435506_index.html>

APA Citation:

Williams, H. V. "In Pursuit of Self: The Identity of an American President and Cosmopolitanism" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435506_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: I Come to Berlin as so many of my countrymen have come before; although tonight, I speak to you not as a candidate for President, but as a citizen-a proud citizen of the United States, and a fellow citizen of the World.

Barack H. Obama, Berlin, July 24, 2008

Obama has much more in common with 18 to 29 year olds, a group I call the First Global Citizens…Having roots in Kenya, lived in Indonesia and raised in poly-ehtnic Hawaii, Obama’s background makes him more of a world citizen than perhaps any other president.

John Zogby, March, 2009

The forty-fourth President of the United States, Barack Hussein Obama, projects an identity that is multiple and fragmented as opposed to one that is essentialist and unitary. This may be equated with a type of philosophical cosmopolitanism that accepts broad notions of self-identity but neither rejects nor eliminates subjective [racial] identities such as “blackness.” In nearly every public setting that the issue of his race has been introduced, Barack Obama, although he routinely self-identifies as an African American, continuously acknowledges his mixed race heritage and the experience of being born of a “white” mother, a “black” father, and raised by his “white” grandparents; stating in his autobiography that, “I can’t even hold up my experience as being somehow representative of the black American experience.” Obama makes this statement in the same breath in which he claims to be writing about his life as a “black American.” This essay argues that American President Barack Obama’s self identity, as based on his writings, speeches, and public statements, may be characterized as hybridized or “fragmented” as opposed to one that is “unitary or essentialist.” Further, the Obama phenomenon has taken place in the context of a particular moment in recent American history known as the post-civil rights era or what some have prematurely defined as “post-racial” America. Particularly, between the years of the Supreme Court decision in Loving vs. Virginia in 1967 and the 2000 census. Obama as an individual subject manages to occupy a range of racial identity positionings that are partial, contradictory, and strategic; that may be best understood, in a particular historical context, in relation to philosophical cosmopolitanism.


Similar Titles:
Converging Realities and Identities: A Case Study of African American and Latino(a) Students Negotiating Self-actualized Duality

The Effects of American Identity and Ethnic Identity on Collective Self-Esteem Among Women.

Racial Identity and Self Awareness: Assessing the Implications of Racial Identity for African American College Students


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.