Citation

It is the Revolt of the Emotions Against Repression: New Orleans, The Evolution of Jazz, & The First Great Migration, 1890-1925

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Abstract:

My presentation examines the role jazz and jazz musicians played in forging cultural and civic institutions in the New Orleans just prior to and during the First Great Migration. Because jazz musicians were only one component of the migration northward, it is crucial to understand the larger narrative of the Great Migration. Consequently, by placing the musicians within the larger framework of the Great Migration, it is evident that elements of the jazz musicians’ experiences were representative of the out-migration from New Orleans. The migrating musicians share certain characteristics, such as their motivations to journey north, which echo the stories of other migrants.
Just as elements of the jazz musicians’ story mirror those of other migrants, a number of characteristics set them apart from the typical African American who left New Orleans during the Great Migration. Jazz musicians had an additional incentive to migrate north. They were hard pressed to find public outlets to ply their craft. This dynamic pushed them from the region and onto places that were receptive to the new musical form and the culture it fostered. Furthermore, the existence of black operated benevolent societies coupled with the long history of Creole and African American activism in New Orleans, encouraged the musicians to become more politically vocal than other migrants. Additionally, due to cultural innovations in language, styles of dress, and demeanor, New Orleans musicians developed a consciousness that separated them from other migrants.
The central arguments of this study revolve around an understanding that jazz musicians were not passive historical participants either during or following migration. As a result, both before they left New Orleans and once they arrived elsewhere, musicians attempted a number of organizing activities to better their conditions and adjust to living in a new environment. Additionally, jazz music acted as a vehicle for social change both in New Orleans and elsewhere. Finally, the distinct and recognizable brand of jazz that developed in New Orleans became the national music as a result of the cultural forces set loose by the Great Migration.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


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URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435632_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Lester, Charlie. "It is the Revolt of the Emotions Against Repression: New Orleans, The Evolution of Jazz, & The First Great Migration, 1890-1925" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435632_index.html>

APA Citation:

Lester, C. , 2010-09-29 "It is the Revolt of the Emotions Against Repression: New Orleans, The Evolution of Jazz, & The First Great Migration, 1890-1925" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435632_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: My presentation examines the role jazz and jazz musicians played in forging cultural and civic institutions in the New Orleans just prior to and during the First Great Migration. Because jazz musicians were only one component of the migration northward, it is crucial to understand the larger narrative of the Great Migration. Consequently, by placing the musicians within the larger framework of the Great Migration, it is evident that elements of the jazz musicians’ experiences were representative of the out-migration from New Orleans. The migrating musicians share certain characteristics, such as their motivations to journey north, which echo the stories of other migrants.
Just as elements of the jazz musicians’ story mirror those of other migrants, a number of characteristics set them apart from the typical African American who left New Orleans during the Great Migration. Jazz musicians had an additional incentive to migrate north. They were hard pressed to find public outlets to ply their craft. This dynamic pushed them from the region and onto places that were receptive to the new musical form and the culture it fostered. Furthermore, the existence of black operated benevolent societies coupled with the long history of Creole and African American activism in New Orleans, encouraged the musicians to become more politically vocal than other migrants. Additionally, due to cultural innovations in language, styles of dress, and demeanor, New Orleans musicians developed a consciousness that separated them from other migrants.
The central arguments of this study revolve around an understanding that jazz musicians were not passive historical participants either during or following migration. As a result, both before they left New Orleans and once they arrived elsewhere, musicians attempted a number of organizing activities to better their conditions and adjust to living in a new environment. Additionally, jazz music acted as a vehicle for social change both in New Orleans and elsewhere. Finally, the distinct and recognizable brand of jazz that developed in New Orleans became the national music as a result of the cultural forces set loose by the Great Migration.


Similar Titles:
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"Bound No'th Blues": Chicago's South Side, the First Great Migration, & Jazz, 1915-1930

Emotional Adaptation: Bringing Emotions into the Study of Transnational Migration

First Ladies of the Twentieth and Twenty-First Centuries: An Evolution of the Role


 
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