Citation

"In the prosecution of a Godly enterprise": The African American Church in Iowa, 1832-1900

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

This paper explores African American religious activity in the Hawkeye State during the 19th century. Although Iowa’s black history has often been overlooked by scholars, even with the growing body of work on the early black Midwest, a closer look at this story reveals several key historical insights. Despite living in small numbers in a racially hostile environment, African Americans were able to establish dozens of religious institutions that not only served a spiritual presence but also became meeting places for schools and other institutions, the leading provider of social services; and centers of political activity. The black church was hugely important in the creation of Iowa’s Civil War regiment, the creation of black male suffrage and the integration of public schools after the war, and other civil rights victories. At the same time, though, the small numbers of black Iowans meant that their churches were often established and sustained with assistance from liberal whites. These connections helped provide financial stability and created patronage ties but also prevented black religious leaders from taking too strong a stance on social issues; thus the church was both a site of racial uplift and a moderating voice that limited uplift options. Exploring this history also sheds light on the tensions based on class, gender, generation, and denomination. Finally, this paper will explore the less-common story of African Americans who attended predominantly white churches, usually because they were the only black family (or in some cases the only individual) in a particular area.
Convention
Need a solution for abstract management? All Academic can help! Contact us today to find out how our system can help your annual meeting.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435694_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Brodnax, Sr., David. ""In the prosecution of a Godly enterprise": The African American Church in Iowa, 1832-1900" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435694_index.html>

APA Citation:

Brodnax, Sr., D. , 2010-09-29 ""In the prosecution of a Godly enterprise": The African American Church in Iowa, 1832-1900" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435694_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores African American religious activity in the Hawkeye State during the 19th century. Although Iowa’s black history has often been overlooked by scholars, even with the growing body of work on the early black Midwest, a closer look at this story reveals several key historical insights. Despite living in small numbers in a racially hostile environment, African Americans were able to establish dozens of religious institutions that not only served a spiritual presence but also became meeting places for schools and other institutions, the leading provider of social services; and centers of political activity. The black church was hugely important in the creation of Iowa’s Civil War regiment, the creation of black male suffrage and the integration of public schools after the war, and other civil rights victories. At the same time, though, the small numbers of black Iowans meant that their churches were often established and sustained with assistance from liberal whites. These connections helped provide financial stability and created patronage ties but also prevented black religious leaders from taking too strong a stance on social issues; thus the church was both a site of racial uplift and a moderating voice that limited uplift options. Exploring this history also sheds light on the tensions based on class, gender, generation, and denomination. Finally, this paper will explore the less-common story of African Americans who attended predominantly white churches, usually because they were the only black family (or in some cases the only individual) in a particular area.


Similar Titles:
Heart of the Rural African American Community: Historic African American Churches of Maryland’s Eastern Shore

Sexuality, Gender, HIV/AIDS, and the Politics of the Church: A Comparison of Two African-American Churches

Identity Politics and Cultural Hybridity: African Americans and African Canadians in the Black Protestant Church, 1825-1910


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.