Citation

Competing Interest: Black Women in Southern Maryland and Their Quest to Shape Wartime and Postwar Labor Patterns

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

In the aftermath of the Civil War, freedwoman Maria Ashton trekked to the District of Columbia in search of work. Despite the urging of a Freedmen’s Bureau agent, she refused to accompany her husband to New York, only to present herself a few months later to the agency as a woman who “cannot obtain employment sufficient for her support.” Although she was described as “industrious and energetic” this Prince George’s County, Maryland native was unable to procure work in an overcrowded nation’s capital teeming with refugees from the Confederacy. As a consequence, she was “desirous of going now” to join her husband and attempt to transition economically from slavery to freedom elsewhere.
Ashton’s journey mirrored that of untold black women from southern Maryland who sought succor in the District of Columbia. During the antebellum period, the city provided them with a place to carve out liminal socio-economic spaces. However, the socio-economic and political climate of the Civil War and Reconstruction periods altered the established relationship between regional blacks and Washington, DC. This paper critically explores how the federal government’s policies and procedures stifled black female Southern Marylanders’ migration into the District of Columbia. More importantly, it examines how these black women (who desired to experience a degree of economic autonomy outside of an oppressive rural environment) adopted nontraditional work patterns, developed innovative economic avenues and challenged those who attempted to limit their access to familiar spaces.
Convention
Submission, Review, and Scheduling! All Academic Convention can help with all of your abstract management needs and many more. Contact us today for a quote!
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435698_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Jacobs, Sharita. "Competing Interest: Black Women in Southern Maryland and Their Quest to Shape Wartime and Postwar Labor Patterns" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435698_index.html>

APA Citation:

Jacobs, S. "Competing Interest: Black Women in Southern Maryland and Their Quest to Shape Wartime and Postwar Labor Patterns" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435698_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: In the aftermath of the Civil War, freedwoman Maria Ashton trekked to the District of Columbia in search of work. Despite the urging of a Freedmen’s Bureau agent, she refused to accompany her husband to New York, only to present herself a few months later to the agency as a woman who “cannot obtain employment sufficient for her support.” Although she was described as “industrious and energetic” this Prince George’s County, Maryland native was unable to procure work in an overcrowded nation’s capital teeming with refugees from the Confederacy. As a consequence, she was “desirous of going now” to join her husband and attempt to transition economically from slavery to freedom elsewhere.
Ashton’s journey mirrored that of untold black women from southern Maryland who sought succor in the District of Columbia. During the antebellum period, the city provided them with a place to carve out liminal socio-economic spaces. However, the socio-economic and political climate of the Civil War and Reconstruction periods altered the established relationship between regional blacks and Washington, DC. This paper critically explores how the federal government’s policies and procedures stifled black female Southern Marylanders’ migration into the District of Columbia. More importantly, it examines how these black women (who desired to experience a degree of economic autonomy outside of an oppressive rural environment) adopted nontraditional work patterns, developed innovative economic avenues and challenged those who attempted to limit their access to familiar spaces.


Similar Titles:
“She Can Hit the Iron While it’s Hot and Bend it Into Any Shape She Desires”: Black women, Crime, Labor, and Punishment in Georgia, 1865-1917

Laboring in Intimacy: Labor Relations and Intimacy among Black Women and White Women in Nineteenth-Century African American Women’s Narratives

Women of War, Women of Freedom: The Wartime Experiences of Enslaved Women in Southern Louisiana and Low Country Georgia, 1861-1865


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.