Citation

The Economics of Social Welfare: White Patrons, Black Donors, and Jane E. Hunter’s Phillis Wheatley Association

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Abstract:

This paper examines the strategies Jane E. Hunter employed to develop an interracial coalition that provided the financial support she needed to maintain the Phillis Wheatley Association, a residential, employment, and recreation facility for single black women she founded in 1911 in Cleveland, Ohio. When thousands of African Americans began migrating to Cleveland in the early 20th century, they found relatively good jobs but a dearth of services to facilitate their transition into urban life. South Carolinian Hunter was among the first to arrive in 1905, after spontaneously accepting an invitation from family friends to accompany them on their move to the North. Her challenges in finding work and avoiding vice convinced Hunter to create a home for homeless young women like herself who came to Cleveland friendless and susceptible to the lures of city life. Hunter first turned to her inner circle to fund her project, convincing seven girlfriends who were employed as domestics and nurses to save a nickel and say a prayer each week for the success of their endeavor. She then began strategizing on how to secure the support of white philanthropists such as Henry Sherwin of Sherwin-Williams Paint Company and John D. Rockefeller while appeasing the demands of increasingly politicized black Clevelanders. Ultimately, Hunter exploited the fears of whites who believed the integration of facilities such as the Y.W.C.A. would drive white clients away, a stance that convinced skeptical African American church groups, club women, and activists who preferred integration to help fund the PWA.
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Name: 95th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435707_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Thomas, Rhondda. "The Economics of Social Welfare: White Patrons, Black Donors, and Jane E. Hunter’s Phillis Wheatley Association" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435707_index.html>

APA Citation:

Thomas, R. R. , 2010-09-29 "The Economics of Social Welfare: White Patrons, Black Donors, and Jane E. Hunter’s Phillis Wheatley Association" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435707_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper examines the strategies Jane E. Hunter employed to develop an interracial coalition that provided the financial support she needed to maintain the Phillis Wheatley Association, a residential, employment, and recreation facility for single black women she founded in 1911 in Cleveland, Ohio. When thousands of African Americans began migrating to Cleveland in the early 20th century, they found relatively good jobs but a dearth of services to facilitate their transition into urban life. South Carolinian Hunter was among the first to arrive in 1905, after spontaneously accepting an invitation from family friends to accompany them on their move to the North. Her challenges in finding work and avoiding vice convinced Hunter to create a home for homeless young women like herself who came to Cleveland friendless and susceptible to the lures of city life. Hunter first turned to her inner circle to fund her project, convincing seven girlfriends who were employed as domestics and nurses to save a nickel and say a prayer each week for the success of their endeavor. She then began strategizing on how to secure the support of white philanthropists such as Henry Sherwin of Sherwin-Williams Paint Company and John D. Rockefeller while appeasing the demands of increasingly politicized black Clevelanders. Ultimately, Hunter exploited the fears of whites who believed the integration of facilities such as the Y.W.C.A. would drive white clients away, a stance that convinced skeptical African American church groups, club women, and activists who preferred integration to help fund the PWA.


Similar Titles:
The Labor of Love: Kinship, Multiracialism, and Antiracist Practice in Jane Lazarre’s "Beyond the Whiteness of Whiteness" and Rebecca Walker’s "Black White and Jewish”

The South Carolina Roots of Black Female Social Activism: Mary McLeod Bethune, Septima Clark, Marian Wright Edelman, and Jane Edna Hunter

Social and Economic Organization of the Black Professoriate at Predominately‐white Colleges and Universities


 
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