Citation

The Business of Black Death in a Southern City: African American Funeral Homes in Raleigh, NC

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

Death is a certainty for all who live. Operating a well-managed funeral home offered a level of economic security not found in many other business ventures engaged in by African Americans at the beginning of the twentieth century. In Raleigh, North Carolina, the first African American owned funeral home began operation in 1908. The goal was to serve the needs of Raleigh’s growing black population and provide the level of respectability and equity that black patrons desired.

In the South at the turn of the twentieth century, Jim Crow laws followed blacks from the cradle to the grave. Black families experiencing the death of a loved one were often left further devastated by the substandard conditions under which their loved one was laid to rest by white funeral home operators.

This paper is an examination of the emergence of African American owned and operated funeral homes in Raleigh, North Carolina from 1900-1980. Using oral history interviews, census records, papers from the State Burial Commissioner, as well as other primary and secondary sources; this paper explores the social, economic, and political conditions that created an environment which fostered the need for businesses such as funeral homes, which catered to black patrons.
Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435729_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Bunch-Lyons, Beverly. "The Business of Black Death in a Southern City: African American Funeral Homes in Raleigh, NC" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435729_index.html>

APA Citation:

Bunch-Lyons, B. , 2010-09-29 "The Business of Black Death in a Southern City: African American Funeral Homes in Raleigh, NC" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435729_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Death is a certainty for all who live. Operating a well-managed funeral home offered a level of economic security not found in many other business ventures engaged in by African Americans at the beginning of the twentieth century. In Raleigh, North Carolina, the first African American owned funeral home began operation in 1908. The goal was to serve the needs of Raleigh’s growing black population and provide the level of respectability and equity that black patrons desired.

In the South at the turn of the twentieth century, Jim Crow laws followed blacks from the cradle to the grave. Black families experiencing the death of a loved one were often left further devastated by the substandard conditions under which their loved one was laid to rest by white funeral home operators.

This paper is an examination of the emergence of African American owned and operated funeral homes in Raleigh, North Carolina from 1900-1980. Using oral history interviews, census records, papers from the State Burial Commissioner, as well as other primary and secondary sources; this paper explores the social, economic, and political conditions that created an environment which fostered the need for businesses such as funeral homes, which catered to black patrons.


Similar Titles:
Blue, Gray, and Black: African American Civil War Reenactments as Performance of Black Southern Identity

The House that Black Built: The Evolution of the Home in African-American Consciousness

Black and White Americans and Latino Immigrants: A Preliminary Look at Attitudes in Three Southern Cities

The Politics of Contraband Northern-Southern Perceptions of Black Laborers and the Phenomenology of African American Soldiers


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.