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The Black Arts Movement in Nashville, Tennessee

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Abstract:

When discussing culture in the United States, Nashville is often associated with a sort of hyper-whiteness, notably the neo-Confederates of the Fugitive Group based at Vanderbilt University and the country music industry (which becomes considerably less “white” than its public image on closer inspection). However, the city also has long contained one of the largest urban black communities of the Upper South and is the home of two important historically black institutions of higher education, Fisk University and Tennessee State University. As a result, Nashville was throughout the twentieth century a significant locus of different sorts of African American expressive culture, both “high” and popular. It was also one of the early hotspots of the black student movement that coalesced into SNCC.

This paper will discuss the importance of Nashville to development of the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and 1970s. In particular, it will take up the impact of the black writers’ conference organized at Fisk by John Killen in the second half of the 1960s. It will also touch on the migration of Black Arts initiatives off the college campus into the community, setting the stage for Nashville’s later evolution into one of the premier sites of African American performance in the United States with ten functioning black theaters and a major annual black theater festival.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435733_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Smethurst, James. "The Black Arts Movement in Nashville, Tennessee" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435733_index.html>

APA Citation:

Smethurst, J. "The Black Arts Movement in Nashville, Tennessee" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435733_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: When discussing culture in the United States, Nashville is often associated with a sort of hyper-whiteness, notably the neo-Confederates of the Fugitive Group based at Vanderbilt University and the country music industry (which becomes considerably less “white” than its public image on closer inspection). However, the city also has long contained one of the largest urban black communities of the Upper South and is the home of two important historically black institutions of higher education, Fisk University and Tennessee State University. As a result, Nashville was throughout the twentieth century a significant locus of different sorts of African American expressive culture, both “high” and popular. It was also one of the early hotspots of the black student movement that coalesced into SNCC.

This paper will discuss the importance of Nashville to development of the Black Arts Movement of the 1960s and 1970s. In particular, it will take up the impact of the black writers’ conference organized at Fisk by John Killen in the second half of the 1960s. It will also touch on the migration of Black Arts initiatives off the college campus into the community, setting the stage for Nashville’s later evolution into one of the premier sites of African American performance in the United States with ten functioning black theaters and a major annual black theater festival.


Similar Titles:
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Analysis of State and Movement Tactical Decisions and Repertoires in the Black Civil Rights Movement 1960-65: Utilizing Field Theory in Social Movement Research

"The Triangle of Black Power: The Relationship between the Black Power Movement, the Black Arts Movement, and Black Studies"


 
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