Citation

Black Women's Activism Engendering Economic Empowerment in the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements

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Abstract:

Cooperatives and other collective economic activities originated out of the necessity to survive the onslaught of economic oppression perpetrated by the white power structure’s need to control and/or severely limit the progress and ramifications of the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements. Black women were cognizant of the potential power of collective productivity and therefore embraced this mode of operation as a way of staving off dire poverty and as a resistance mechanism against white racist oppression. However, one should question what other benefits were derived from the collective work and enterprises of these women? This paper critically interrogates the role of “cooperatives” and other collective economic activities as an economic and psychological empowerment tools in the lives of black women civil rights and black power activists. Black women who engaged in these enterprises not only gained a sense of economic independence, but also a glimpse into their own human potentialities. These women portrayed an air of competence, creativity and commitment the moves beyond mere survival into the realm of thriving. Consequently, these attributes facilitated their challenging some of the traditional mores about the black woman’s place in the very public economic sphere.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435750_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Tomlinson, Linda. "Black Women's Activism Engendering Economic Empowerment in the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435750_index.html>

APA Citation:

Tomlinson, L. D. , 2010-09-29 "Black Women's Activism Engendering Economic Empowerment in the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435750_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Cooperatives and other collective economic activities originated out of the necessity to survive the onslaught of economic oppression perpetrated by the white power structure’s need to control and/or severely limit the progress and ramifications of the Civil Rights and Black Power Movements. Black women were cognizant of the potential power of collective productivity and therefore embraced this mode of operation as a way of staving off dire poverty and as a resistance mechanism against white racist oppression. However, one should question what other benefits were derived from the collective work and enterprises of these women? This paper critically interrogates the role of “cooperatives” and other collective economic activities as an economic and psychological empowerment tools in the lives of black women civil rights and black power activists. Black women who engaged in these enterprises not only gained a sense of economic independence, but also a glimpse into their own human potentialities. These women portrayed an air of competence, creativity and commitment the moves beyond mere survival into the realm of thriving. Consequently, these attributes facilitated their challenging some of the traditional mores about the black woman’s place in the very public economic sphere.


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Civil Rights, Black Power and Economic Development: A historical foundation for the Reparations Movement

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"Sister Warrior: Black Women Musicians and the “Voicing” of the Civil Rights Movement"


 
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