Citation

We Are All Family: The Educational Activism of Bertha Maxwell Roddey

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

When African American students demanded that the University of North Carolina at Charlotte establish a black studies program, it looked to professor and former public school principal Bertha Maxwell Roddey to serve as its first director. When seeking references for Roddey, a former employer stated “if you really don’t want a black studies program then don’t hire Dr. Roddey because she is going to get that program!” This quote epitomizes the image of Roddey as a woman who successfully created her own strong, maternal style of leadership as an educator and as an activist. After serving as the first black woman principal of a white elementary school in Charlotte during the 1960s, Roddey became the director of UNC-Charlotte’s Black Studies Program in 1969. As director, she refuted critics by developing an academically sound program, while also creating a nurturing space for students. Known as the "Mother of Black Studies," Roddey helped to establish the field nationally as the co-founder of the National Council of Black Studies. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, Roddey worked tirelessly serving as the co-founder of Charlotte’s African American Cultural Center, now the Harvey Gantt Center for the Arts, and as the 20th president of Delta Sigma Theta, a national public service sorority.
As scholars re-examine the parameters of the civil rights movement, this presentation will explore the life and experiences of a woman who helped to combine the rewards of the movement with the ideology of black nationalism to build educational and cultural structures affecting young people from the elementary to the college level. By looking at the activities of Roddey, we can revisit the classic idea of racial uplift. What does it mean to uplift African Americans in a desegregated society long after the roar of the civil rights movement has quieted down? Roddey created her own definition that included fighting for young people to gain equal opportunities, while also infusing these same students with a strong knowledge of their African American heritage. She also reconfigured the traditional masculine image of a black nationalist to include southern women, classroom teachers, and sorority members.
Convention
All Academic Convention makes running your annual conference simple and cost effective. It is your online solution for abstract management, peer review, and scheduling for your annual meeting or convention.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435770_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Ramsey, Sonya. "We Are All Family: The Educational Activism of Bertha Maxwell Roddey" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435770_index.html>

APA Citation:

Ramsey, S. "We Are All Family: The Educational Activism of Bertha Maxwell Roddey" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435770_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: When African American students demanded that the University of North Carolina at Charlotte establish a black studies program, it looked to professor and former public school principal Bertha Maxwell Roddey to serve as its first director. When seeking references for Roddey, a former employer stated “if you really don’t want a black studies program then don’t hire Dr. Roddey because she is going to get that program!” This quote epitomizes the image of Roddey as a woman who successfully created her own strong, maternal style of leadership as an educator and as an activist. After serving as the first black woman principal of a white elementary school in Charlotte during the 1960s, Roddey became the director of UNC-Charlotte’s Black Studies Program in 1969. As director, she refuted critics by developing an academically sound program, while also creating a nurturing space for students. Known as the "Mother of Black Studies," Roddey helped to establish the field nationally as the co-founder of the National Council of Black Studies. Throughout the 1970s and 1980s, Roddey worked tirelessly serving as the co-founder of Charlotte’s African American Cultural Center, now the Harvey Gantt Center for the Arts, and as the 20th president of Delta Sigma Theta, a national public service sorority.
As scholars re-examine the parameters of the civil rights movement, this presentation will explore the life and experiences of a woman who helped to combine the rewards of the movement with the ideology of black nationalism to build educational and cultural structures affecting young people from the elementary to the college level. By looking at the activities of Roddey, we can revisit the classic idea of racial uplift. What does it mean to uplift African Americans in a desegregated society long after the roar of the civil rights movement has quieted down? Roddey created her own definition that included fighting for young people to gain equal opportunities, while also infusing these same students with a strong knowledge of their African American heritage. She also reconfigured the traditional masculine image of a black nationalist to include southern women, classroom teachers, and sorority members.


Similar Titles:
Re-Conceptualizing “Parent” Education in Predicting Children’s Educational Attainment: How Attention to the Non-Residential Parent’s Education is Key to Understanding the Lower Educational Outcomes of Children Raised in Single Parent Families

The Educational Activism of Black Teachers: Kathleen Crosby, Bertha Maxwell-Roddey, and Southern Educators, 1960s-1980s

Opting out of the Family? Racial Inequality in Family Formation Patterns Among Highly Educated Women


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.