Citation

Racial Uplift and the Pittsburgh Urban League’s Migrant Family Adjustment Program during the Great Migration Era

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Abstract:

Author: Nina E. Banks, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics
Address: Department of Economics, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837; USA
Telephone: 570-577-1652
Fax: 570-577-3451
E-mail: nbanks@bucknell.edu


Title of Paper: Racial Uplift and the Pittsburgh Urban League’s Migrant Family Adjustment Program during the Great Migration Era

Abstract:
This paper discusses an historical case study of the Urban League of Pittsburgh’s Migrant Adjustment Program during the 1916 -1930 Great Migration era. This time period represents the mass migration of African Americans from the rural south to northern and mid-western urban areas and the beginning of their transformation into an industrial working class. Southern blacks migrated to northward destinations in order to improve their position within the political economy. The paper discusses the League’s attempts to “uplift” blacks by encouraging married migrant women to attend to domestic duties and forego employment. The League’s desire to encourage domesticity within the migrant community was an attempt to counter prevailing ideologies about gender and race during the early twentieth century. According to this belief system, African Americans were on a lower rung of civilization compared to whites because of the large percentage of employed wives. The paper discusses the implications of the Pittsburgh Urban League’s domesticity program for African American migrant households and the ways in which these women resisted the League’s efforts and argues, instead, that their resistance reinforced retention of southern values and traditions.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435782_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Banks, Nina. "Racial Uplift and the Pittsburgh Urban League’s Migrant Family Adjustment Program during the Great Migration Era" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435782_index.html>

APA Citation:

Banks, N. , 2010-09-29 "Racial Uplift and the Pittsburgh Urban League’s Migrant Family Adjustment Program during the Great Migration Era" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435782_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Author: Nina E. Banks, Ph.D., Associate Professor of Economics
Address: Department of Economics, Bucknell University, Lewisburg, PA 17837; USA
Telephone: 570-577-1652
Fax: 570-577-3451
E-mail: nbanks@bucknell.edu


Title of Paper: Racial Uplift and the Pittsburgh Urban League’s Migrant Family Adjustment Program during the Great Migration Era

Abstract:
This paper discusses an historical case study of the Urban League of Pittsburgh’s Migrant Adjustment Program during the 1916 -1930 Great Migration era. This time period represents the mass migration of African Americans from the rural south to northern and mid-western urban areas and the beginning of their transformation into an industrial working class. Southern blacks migrated to northward destinations in order to improve their position within the political economy. The paper discusses the League’s attempts to “uplift” blacks by encouraging married migrant women to attend to domestic duties and forego employment. The League’s desire to encourage domesticity within the migrant community was an attempt to counter prevailing ideologies about gender and race during the early twentieth century. According to this belief system, African Americans were on a lower rung of civilization compared to whites because of the large percentage of employed wives. The paper discusses the implications of the Pittsburgh Urban League’s domesticity program for African American migrant households and the ways in which these women resisted the League’s efforts and argues, instead, that their resistance reinforced retention of southern values and traditions.


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