Citation

The New Negro Goes to School: Black History and the Negro Renaissance

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Abstract:

“The New Negro Goes to School: Black History and the Negro Renaissance” will look at the role that black history played in the flowering of African American art during the 1920 and 1930s. In his 1940 autobiography, Dusk of Dawn, W.E.B. Du Bois wrote that the “greatest single accomplishment” of the “artistic movement among American Negroes” was Carter G. Woodson’s Negro History Week. Unlike so many of Du Bois’ pronouncements, which scholars have seized on to pursue so many different lines of inquiry, this particular assertion has barely registered. In decades of scholarship on the Harlem or Negro Renaissance, historians and literary scholars alike have all but ignored the early black history movement (see, for example, Nathan Irving Huggins, 1971; David Levering Lewis, 1981; Ann Douglas, 1995; and George Hutchinson, 1995). The reverse is also true with the Negro Renaissance all but absent from scholarship treating early black history (see, for instance, August Meier and Elliott Rudwick, 1986; Jacqueline Goggin, 1993; and Pero Gaglo Dagbovie, 2007). If mentioned at all, the Negro history movement is portrayed as running in parallel to the renaissance, perhaps partaking of the same “spirit of race pride” but not directly interacting with or contributing to it in any significant way. I will argue that black history was in fact an integral component of the renaissance, providing a foundation for the awakening of African Americans as “a people.” And, moreover, that the early black history movement, especially through the vehicle of Negro History Week, nationalized the renaissance, bringing its poetry, literature, drama and music to African Americans throughout the country.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435842_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Snyder, Jeffrey. "The New Negro Goes to School: Black History and the Negro Renaissance" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435842_index.html>

APA Citation:

Snyder, J. A. "The New Negro Goes to School: Black History and the Negro Renaissance" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435842_index.html

Publication Type: Invited Paper
Abstract: “The New Negro Goes to School: Black History and the Negro Renaissance” will look at the role that black history played in the flowering of African American art during the 1920 and 1930s. In his 1940 autobiography, Dusk of Dawn, W.E.B. Du Bois wrote that the “greatest single accomplishment” of the “artistic movement among American Negroes” was Carter G. Woodson’s Negro History Week. Unlike so many of Du Bois’ pronouncements, which scholars have seized on to pursue so many different lines of inquiry, this particular assertion has barely registered. In decades of scholarship on the Harlem or Negro Renaissance, historians and literary scholars alike have all but ignored the early black history movement (see, for example, Nathan Irving Huggins, 1971; David Levering Lewis, 1981; Ann Douglas, 1995; and George Hutchinson, 1995). The reverse is also true with the Negro Renaissance all but absent from scholarship treating early black history (see, for instance, August Meier and Elliott Rudwick, 1986; Jacqueline Goggin, 1993; and Pero Gaglo Dagbovie, 2007). If mentioned at all, the Negro history movement is portrayed as running in parallel to the renaissance, perhaps partaking of the same “spirit of race pride” but not directly interacting with or contributing to it in any significant way. I will argue that black history was in fact an integral component of the renaissance, providing a foundation for the awakening of African Americans as “a people.” And, moreover, that the early black history movement, especially through the vehicle of Negro History Week, nationalized the renaissance, bringing its poetry, literature, drama and music to African Americans throughout the country.


Similar Titles:
"To Appeal. . .for the Adoption of Negro History:" Negro History Week as Unofficial Education Policy in Public Schools, 1926-1966

Black & Brown Children Just Don't Get It: Compton Public School's Low Academic Achievement and its Relationship to the Omission of African American & Chicano History and Culture

Navigating Forgotten Histories: An Oral History Approach to Understanding the Life Experiences of Black Detroit High School Student Activists of the Black Power Movement


 
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