Citation

Finding Freedom in Mexico: An Analysis of African Americans and the Texas Annexation Controversy

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Abstract:

The United States has a long history of a complex relationship with Mexico that continues to significantly influence politics, immigration, and international trade. Currently, the issue that is most frequently discussed in conversations about relations between the U.S. and Mexico is the influx of illegal immigrants in America and maintaining border security due to drug trafficking. What is intentionally excluded from these discussions is an analysis of the numerous wrongs the U.S. government has committed against Mexico both in the past and present. The American government’s theft of half of Mexico’s territory in particular represents how this country has bullied its southern neighbor into acquiescing to white supremacy. Also excluded from the dialogue is how African Americans factored into the debate over the Texas territory and why whites in Texas were intent on annexation.
The issue of slavery in Texas under Mexican governance generated intense debate and controversy as whites in the territory campaigned for support from U.S. politicians to advocate on their behalf for annexation. Events leading up to the annexation and annexation itself were the original impetus for unfriendly relations between the U.S and Mexico. Consequently, the American government fabricated a war with Mexico to conceal its motivation for Texas annexation, which was to expand slavery and extend the slave power. This directly affected African Americans in Texas in that it destroyed their right to freedom under Mexican law and guaranteed perpetual servitude. Furthermore, annexation was also a concerted effort to disempower an ally to African Americans.
This paper will argue that Mexico established itself as a safe haven for African Americans in 1829 and offered more equal opportunities, the primary opportunity being freedom. Early abolition of slavery, Mexico’s refusal not to guarantee asylum to fugitive slaves, and the debate over slavery in Texas also contributed to African Americans’ perception of Mexico. Included in this analysis will be a discussion of black life in Texas during and after Mexican governance to indicate that black people experienced a decline in their quality of life once Texas became an independent republic. More importantly, the paper will also discuss Texas annexation as a strategy to guard against any possible influence from Mexico's abolition of slavery.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435890_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Carroll, Savannah. "Finding Freedom in Mexico: An Analysis of African Americans and the Texas Annexation Controversy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435890_index.html>

APA Citation:

Carroll, S. , 2010-09-29 "Finding Freedom in Mexico: An Analysis of African Americans and the Texas Annexation Controversy" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435890_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: The United States has a long history of a complex relationship with Mexico that continues to significantly influence politics, immigration, and international trade. Currently, the issue that is most frequently discussed in conversations about relations between the U.S. and Mexico is the influx of illegal immigrants in America and maintaining border security due to drug trafficking. What is intentionally excluded from these discussions is an analysis of the numerous wrongs the U.S. government has committed against Mexico both in the past and present. The American government’s theft of half of Mexico’s territory in particular represents how this country has bullied its southern neighbor into acquiescing to white supremacy. Also excluded from the dialogue is how African Americans factored into the debate over the Texas territory and why whites in Texas were intent on annexation.
The issue of slavery in Texas under Mexican governance generated intense debate and controversy as whites in the territory campaigned for support from U.S. politicians to advocate on their behalf for annexation. Events leading up to the annexation and annexation itself were the original impetus for unfriendly relations between the U.S and Mexico. Consequently, the American government fabricated a war with Mexico to conceal its motivation for Texas annexation, which was to expand slavery and extend the slave power. This directly affected African Americans in Texas in that it destroyed their right to freedom under Mexican law and guaranteed perpetual servitude. Furthermore, annexation was also a concerted effort to disempower an ally to African Americans.
This paper will argue that Mexico established itself as a safe haven for African Americans in 1829 and offered more equal opportunities, the primary opportunity being freedom. Early abolition of slavery, Mexico’s refusal not to guarantee asylum to fugitive slaves, and the debate over slavery in Texas also contributed to African Americans’ perception of Mexico. Included in this analysis will be a discussion of black life in Texas during and after Mexican governance to indicate that black people experienced a decline in their quality of life once Texas became an independent republic. More importantly, the paper will also discuss Texas annexation as a strategy to guard against any possible influence from Mexico's abolition of slavery.


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