Citation

As I Am: Representations of Black Women in the work of Elizabeth Catlett, Betye Saar and Faith Ringgold.

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Abstract:

This paper explores the ways in which the work of Elizabeth Catlett, Faith Ringgold, and Betye Saar questioned and dispelled patriarchal American ideals which surrounded the black female identity. From the 1940’s to the present, each developed a specific approach to representing the black female as subject matter in fine art which was based upon their unique and personal experiences as black women. As an expatriate, Catlett has a distinct lens through which she observes the black female experience. Though her art is non-confrontational to the viewer, it confronts western stereotypes by presenting a realistic image of black women. Betye Saar’s work re-frames and re-defines western images of black women through assemblage. Her art deconstructs the original image and reassembles it into one that overtly confronts the stereotype, giving it new meaning and inciting a serious look into the lives of black women. Faith Ringgold works to create power for black women, particularly black women artists because she was consistently discriminated against by artists in the Black Arts Movement and the Feminist Movement. She challenges western stereotypes as well as the popular artistic establishment by presenting black women in leadership roles and creating Where We At: Black Women Artists (WWA) in 1971. Their work provides the foundation of the black female aesthetic in fine art. Together they mold a new approach and new representation of black women in visual art.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435988_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Morgan, Kelli. "As I Am: Representations of Black Women in the work of Elizabeth Catlett, Betye Saar and Faith Ringgold." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435988_index.html>

APA Citation:

Morgan, K. , 2010-09-29 "As I Am: Representations of Black Women in the work of Elizabeth Catlett, Betye Saar and Faith Ringgold." Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p435988_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: This paper explores the ways in which the work of Elizabeth Catlett, Faith Ringgold, and Betye Saar questioned and dispelled patriarchal American ideals which surrounded the black female identity. From the 1940’s to the present, each developed a specific approach to representing the black female as subject matter in fine art which was based upon their unique and personal experiences as black women. As an expatriate, Catlett has a distinct lens through which she observes the black female experience. Though her art is non-confrontational to the viewer, it confronts western stereotypes by presenting a realistic image of black women. Betye Saar’s work re-frames and re-defines western images of black women through assemblage. Her art deconstructs the original image and reassembles it into one that overtly confronts the stereotype, giving it new meaning and inciting a serious look into the lives of black women. Faith Ringgold works to create power for black women, particularly black women artists because she was consistently discriminated against by artists in the Black Arts Movement and the Feminist Movement. She challenges western stereotypes as well as the popular artistic establishment by presenting black women in leadership roles and creating Where We At: Black Women Artists (WWA) in 1971. Their work provides the foundation of the black female aesthetic in fine art. Together they mold a new approach and new representation of black women in visual art.


Similar Titles:
Black Visions: The Transformation of Memory in the Works of Margaret Walker and Elizabeth Catlett

Working Title: Women Chief Justices: Representing Women’s Interests?

Our Side of the Story: Representations of Black Women in the work of Elizabeth Catlett


 
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