Citation

Emancipated But Not Free: The Post-Emancipation Apprenticeship System in Frederick County, Maryland, 1864-1870

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

After declaring emancipation on 1 November 1864, many of Maryland’s former slaveholders petitioned their county Orphans’ Courts to keep freed children bound as apprentices. Previous studies of the post-Emancipation apprenticeship system have focused primarily on the planter counties of Eastern Shore and Southern Maryland. However the focus of this work is to uncover and analyze the social conditions of those freed persons directly affected by apprenticeships in the western region of the state, specifically, Frederick County, Maryland, from 1864-1870.

This study uses an Afrocentric and subaltern theoretical approach to analyze the 111 cases of African American apprenticeship, focusing on the lives of both children and parents from the Frederick County’s Orphans’ Court records. Important demographics on these children are reaped from these records, including the names, ages and the assignment of menial labor like farming and domestic duties. All of this meant that freed children were indeed the most vulnerable people in the wake of Emancipation. They were left in the hands of a white master before freedom was fully realized.

The immediate legacy of Frederick County’s post-Emancipation apprenticeship system is also assessed through locating apprenticed children in 1870 US Federal Census and analyzing their socio-economic condition. The overall impact of apprenticeship was the implementation of a system that allowed white owners to maintain social and economic hegemony after the demise of slavery while limiting opportunities for familial development, economic sovereignty, and social independence among this group of the first emancipated generation in Frederick County.
Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436022_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Gartrell, John. "Emancipated But Not Free: The Post-Emancipation Apprenticeship System in Frederick County, Maryland, 1864-1870" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436022_index.html>

APA Citation:

Gartrell, J. B. , 2010-09-29 "Emancipated But Not Free: The Post-Emancipation Apprenticeship System in Frederick County, Maryland, 1864-1870" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436022_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: After declaring emancipation on 1 November 1864, many of Maryland’s former slaveholders petitioned their county Orphans’ Courts to keep freed children bound as apprentices. Previous studies of the post-Emancipation apprenticeship system have focused primarily on the planter counties of Eastern Shore and Southern Maryland. However the focus of this work is to uncover and analyze the social conditions of those freed persons directly affected by apprenticeships in the western region of the state, specifically, Frederick County, Maryland, from 1864-1870.

This study uses an Afrocentric and subaltern theoretical approach to analyze the 111 cases of African American apprenticeship, focusing on the lives of both children and parents from the Frederick County’s Orphans’ Court records. Important demographics on these children are reaped from these records, including the names, ages and the assignment of menial labor like farming and domestic duties. All of this meant that freed children were indeed the most vulnerable people in the wake of Emancipation. They were left in the hands of a white master before freedom was fully realized.

The immediate legacy of Frederick County’s post-Emancipation apprenticeship system is also assessed through locating apprenticed children in 1870 US Federal Census and analyzing their socio-economic condition. The overall impact of apprenticeship was the implementation of a system that allowed white owners to maintain social and economic hegemony after the demise of slavery while limiting opportunities for familial development, economic sovereignty, and social independence among this group of the first emancipated generation in Frederick County.


Similar Titles:
Labor, Free Labor, and Freedom in the Post–Emancipation Caribbean

Emancipated But Not Free: The Post-Emancipation Apprenticeship System

Frederick Douglass’ Aim for a True Civic Nation in a Post- Emancipated America


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.