Citation

The Economic Practices of Social Outcasts in Jamaica’s Post-Treaty Context: 1740-1824

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Abstract:

It is true; Africans developed various types of economic systems and conducted extensive trade with societies in Asia and Europe. It is also true that Africans enslaved in the Americas devised economic activities as well as markets to acquire not only necessities and material possessions but to support freedom movements. In this paper, I center attention on the economic pursuits of militants, rebels, runaways and maroons in eighteenth and nineteenth century Jamaica. I am specifically concern with these groups in the post-treaty period, an era that begins after the signing of the 1739 and 1740 treaties between the plantocracy and willing maroons.

I contend that the social outcasts of the post-treaty context, which was marked with an aggressive expansion of plantation systems, were important to the economic structures that blacks established in Jamaica during this period. In examining their participation in the black economic order I discuss the interior trading systems of post-treaty maroon polities like the market created by “We nuh Sen yu nuh come” in the parish of Trelawny. This space was an important hub of commerce that attracted not only citizens of this settlement but enslaved buyers and sellers from the parish and neighboring parishes. This is just one of several examples that the paper will highlight to show that as much as the outlaws were concerned with alternative political realties they were also dedicated to instituting economic systems that would sustain their needs and their political ideologies. Out of these practices emerges some of the earliest expressions of black empowerment in Jamaica and this paper conveys the realities, ambitions, and obstacles that shaped the movement during slavery.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436023_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Barima, Dr. Kofi. "The Economic Practices of Social Outcasts in Jamaica’s Post-Treaty Context: 1740-1824" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436023_index.html>

APA Citation:

Barima, D. B. , 2010-09-29 "The Economic Practices of Social Outcasts in Jamaica’s Post-Treaty Context: 1740-1824" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436023_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: It is true; Africans developed various types of economic systems and conducted extensive trade with societies in Asia and Europe. It is also true that Africans enslaved in the Americas devised economic activities as well as markets to acquire not only necessities and material possessions but to support freedom movements. In this paper, I center attention on the economic pursuits of militants, rebels, runaways and maroons in eighteenth and nineteenth century Jamaica. I am specifically concern with these groups in the post-treaty period, an era that begins after the signing of the 1739 and 1740 treaties between the plantocracy and willing maroons.

I contend that the social outcasts of the post-treaty context, which was marked with an aggressive expansion of plantation systems, were important to the economic structures that blacks established in Jamaica during this period. In examining their participation in the black economic order I discuss the interior trading systems of post-treaty maroon polities like the market created by “We nuh Sen yu nuh come” in the parish of Trelawny. This space was an important hub of commerce that attracted not only citizens of this settlement but enslaved buyers and sellers from the parish and neighboring parishes. This is just one of several examples that the paper will highlight to show that as much as the outlaws were concerned with alternative political realties they were also dedicated to instituting economic systems that would sustain their needs and their political ideologies. Out of these practices emerges some of the earliest expressions of black empowerment in Jamaica and this paper conveys the realities, ambitions, and obstacles that shaped the movement during slavery.


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