Citation

Black Bourgeoisie: The Benefits of Black Enterprise in Durham, NC, 1880-1960

Abstract | Word Stems | Keywords | Association | Citation | Similar Titles



Abstract:

E. Franklin Frazier’s book, Black Bourgeoisie, framed the economic enterprise pursued by Blacks since emancipation as mostly insignificant with regard to the greater American economy. He claimed it did not produce independence in the Black community, and that financially they did not give back in a way that would represent a change in the status quo. He wrote Black Bourgeoisie in 1957, focused mainly on the emergence of the middle class in the first half of the twentieth century. Frazier’s analysis of how industry labor changed the dynamics of economics in the South, from an agricultural foundation to textile and other operations, is unique to many cities in the United States, but especially unique in the city of Durham, North Carolina.
Durham’s Black Republicans embodied all the core aspects of Frazier’s bourgeois class, economically, politically, and socially. It is my intent to illustrate the emergence of the bourgeois class in Durham, and a thorough analysis of their contributions in the Black communities. Frazier discussed the Social Myth idea, and claimed that Black businesses and enterprises did not create self-reliance for Blacks. Using Frazier’s Social Myth idea, I will attempt to determine the benefits of Black enterprise in Durham, NC. My study will range from 1880 to 1960.
Convention
All Academic Convention is the premier solution for your association's abstract management solutions needs.
Submission - Custom fields, multiple submission types, tracks, audio visual, multiple upload formats, automatic conversion to pdf.Review - Peer Review, Bulk reviewer assignment, bulk emails, ranking, z-score statistics, and multiple worksheets!
Reports - Many standard and custom reports generated while you wait. Print programs with participant indexes, event grids, and more!Scheduling - Flexible and convenient grid scheduling within rooms and buildings. Conflict checking and advanced filtering.
Communication - Bulk email tools to help your administrators send reminders and responses. Use form letters, a message center, and much more!Management - Search tools, duplicate people management, editing tools, submission transfers, many tools to manage a variety of conference management headaches!
Click here for more information.

Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436052_index.html
Direct Link:
HTML Code:

MLA Citation:

Love, Kali. "Black Bourgeoisie: The Benefits of Black Enterprise in Durham, NC, 1880-1960" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436052_index.html>

APA Citation:

Love, K. A. , 2010-09-29 "Black Bourgeoisie: The Benefits of Black Enterprise in Durham, NC, 1880-1960" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436052_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: E. Franklin Frazier’s book, Black Bourgeoisie, framed the economic enterprise pursued by Blacks since emancipation as mostly insignificant with regard to the greater American economy. He claimed it did not produce independence in the Black community, and that financially they did not give back in a way that would represent a change in the status quo. He wrote Black Bourgeoisie in 1957, focused mainly on the emergence of the middle class in the first half of the twentieth century. Frazier’s analysis of how industry labor changed the dynamics of economics in the South, from an agricultural foundation to textile and other operations, is unique to many cities in the United States, but especially unique in the city of Durham, North Carolina.
Durham’s Black Republicans embodied all the core aspects of Frazier’s bourgeois class, economically, politically, and socially. It is my intent to illustrate the emergence of the bourgeois class in Durham, and a thorough analysis of their contributions in the Black communities. Frazier discussed the Social Myth idea, and claimed that Black businesses and enterprises did not create self-reliance for Blacks. Using Frazier’s Social Myth idea, I will attempt to determine the benefits of Black enterprise in Durham, NC. My study will range from 1880 to 1960.


Similar Titles:
Durham, N.C.'s First Black Graded School 1880 - 1925

“Black Wall Street, Black Politics, and the Long Black Freedom Struggle in Durham, North Carolina, 1930 to 1970”

Sitting down to stand up: Black student suspensions/expulsions at historically black colleges and universities (HBCUs), 1960--1962: A phenomenological study

Talented Tenth or Black Bourgeoisie: Contemporary Black Educational Elites


 
All Academic, Inc. is your premier source for research and conference management. Visit our website, www.allacademic.com, to see how we can help you today.