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Racial Uplifting: The Early Life of Grace P. Campbell a founding member of the African Black Brotherhood

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Abstract:

Grace P. Campbell was a “race woman” who stood with one foot in the Progressive Era and the other in the bosom of the black militant left. She is an important link between the reformist movement of the nineteenth-century and the emergence of the radical black left within the “new Negro movement” in the twentieth-century. She was active in racial uplift charity work and the only female founder of the African Black Brotherhood that holds the distinction of beginning the precursor to black national radical organizations in the twentieth-century. Her activism went from uplifting to agitating, in an era when she and other “comrades” regularly debated about the impending “revolution” in the comfort of her parlor. In succeeding years, she and other “comrades” would empower, and at times constrain, the “new Negro movement” in its effort to build a more just society. An intent of this essay is to fill in some blank spaces about the early life of Grace P. Campbell. Her life-story is an enigma. The theme that is interwoven within the thesis of this essay is that she was a product of a strong family tradition that prepared and encouraged her to resist the constraints the larger society sought to impose on her and other oppressed people. The process for resisting societal constrictions resonated in the legacy of her parentage and was manifested in her early life. This narrative is not a fait accompli; instead, it is a composite of notes with a bent. The aim is to begin the bard, so that others will have something to draw from either by rejecting or agreeing with some of the contentions presented in the essay, as new questions are asked and other sources become available.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
URL:
http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436075_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Lindsey, Lydia. "Racial Uplifting: The Early Life of Grace P. Campbell a founding member of the African Black Brotherhood" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436075_index.html>

APA Citation:

Lindsey, L. , 2010-09-29 "Racial Uplifting: The Early Life of Grace P. Campbell a founding member of the African Black Brotherhood" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436075_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: Grace P. Campbell was a “race woman” who stood with one foot in the Progressive Era and the other in the bosom of the black militant left. She is an important link between the reformist movement of the nineteenth-century and the emergence of the radical black left within the “new Negro movement” in the twentieth-century. She was active in racial uplift charity work and the only female founder of the African Black Brotherhood that holds the distinction of beginning the precursor to black national radical organizations in the twentieth-century. Her activism went from uplifting to agitating, in an era when she and other “comrades” regularly debated about the impending “revolution” in the comfort of her parlor. In succeeding years, she and other “comrades” would empower, and at times constrain, the “new Negro movement” in its effort to build a more just society. An intent of this essay is to fill in some blank spaces about the early life of Grace P. Campbell. Her life-story is an enigma. The theme that is interwoven within the thesis of this essay is that she was a product of a strong family tradition that prepared and encouraged her to resist the constraints the larger society sought to impose on her and other oppressed people. The process for resisting societal constrictions resonated in the legacy of her parentage and was manifested in her early life. This narrative is not a fait accompli; instead, it is a composite of notes with a bent. The aim is to begin the bard, so that others will have something to draw from either by rejecting or agreeing with some of the contentions presented in the essay, as new questions are asked and other sources become available.


Similar Titles:
Intra-racial Differences in an Increasingly Inter-racial World: Native-born Black American and African and Afro-Caribbean Interests in Government and Participation in the U.S.

Black Republicans…Black Politics? Racial Identification and Republican Partisanship among African Americans


 
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