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Black American Economic Empowerment and Maria W. Stewart, 1831-1833

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Abstract:

In the paper I propose, I am concerned with Stewart's thinking concerning economic matters, and I am concerned especially with her opposition set out in 1832 to the negative opinion that blacks in general or free blacks in particular were lazy. With respect to the lattermentioned, it is possible with a high degree of likelihood that Stewart is the first black American--man or woman--to opppose that negative opinion. In the late 18th century, Jupiter Hammon (1787) as well as Absalom Jones and Richard Allen (1794) recommended to free blacks that they not be lazy, because, as Hammon and Jones and Allen saw things, the opponents of black freedom would try to use black laziness to prevent black slaves from being freed. In the early 19th century, black thinkers addressed attention to many, many important and interesting things, but not--apparently-- to the negative opinion that blacks are lazy. (See, for example, the relevant works included in, say, Benjamin Brawley's "Early Negro American Writers" (1935), and so on, as well as Dorothy Porter's "Early Negro Writing" (1971).) In our time, several scholars have addressed attention to Stewart's thinking, but, from Marilyn Richardson (1987) to Jacqueline Bacon (1998), and so on, as well as Kristin Waters (2008) and Willie J.
Harrell, Jr. (2008), either they have not looked at Stewart's opposition to the negative opinion claiming black laziness, or they have looked at it but they didn't get things right.
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Association:
Name: 95th Annual Convention
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http://www.asalh.org


Citation:
URL: http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436084_index.html
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MLA Citation:

Carson, Jack. "Black American Economic Empowerment and Maria W. Stewart, 1831-1833" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina, Sep 29, 2010 <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 <http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436084_index.html>

APA Citation:

Carson, J. , 2010-09-29 "Black American Economic Empowerment and Maria W. Stewart, 1831-1833" Paper presented at the annual meeting of the 95th Annual Convention, Raleigh Convention Center, Raleigh, North Carolina <Not Available>. 2014-11-27 from http://citation.allacademic.com/meta/p436084_index.html

Publication Type: Individual Paper
Review Method: Peer Reviewed
Abstract: In the paper I propose, I am concerned with Stewart's thinking concerning economic matters, and I am concerned especially with her opposition set out in 1832 to the negative opinion that blacks in general or free blacks in particular were lazy. With respect to the lattermentioned, it is possible with a high degree of likelihood that Stewart is the first black American--man or woman--to opppose that negative opinion. In the late 18th century, Jupiter Hammon (1787) as well as Absalom Jones and Richard Allen (1794) recommended to free blacks that they not be lazy, because, as Hammon and Jones and Allen saw things, the opponents of black freedom would try to use black laziness to prevent black slaves from being freed. In the early 19th century, black thinkers addressed attention to many, many important and interesting things, but not--apparently-- to the negative opinion that blacks are lazy. (See, for example, the relevant works included in, say, Benjamin Brawley's "Early Negro American Writers" (1935), and so on, as well as Dorothy Porter's "Early Negro Writing" (1971).) In our time, several scholars have addressed attention to Stewart's thinking, but, from Marilyn Richardson (1987) to Jacqueline Bacon (1998), and so on, as well as Kristin Waters (2008) and Willie J.
Harrell, Jr. (2008), either they have not looked at Stewart's opposition to the negative opinion claiming black laziness, or they have looked at it but they didn't get things right.


Similar Titles:
‘Your Blood Flows in My Veins’: The Feminization of African American Deliverance in Maria Stewart’s Appeals to White Women

African American Barbers: An Economic Force in the Black Community

Strength, Independence, and Economic Inequality: The Effects of Social Programs and Atlanta’s Black Popular Culture on Identity Formation among African American Women Living Below Poverty in Atlanta


 
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